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Course Descriptions

Allied Health

 AHS 101

Introduction to Complementary Care & Alternative Medicine 
2 credits Fall HF
An overview of the history, philosophy, and approaches of complementary care and alternative medicine (CAM).  A variety of categories of CAM and their integration into the western medicine model will be explored.
Skills prerequisite:  ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: Word processing skills recommended.

AHS 103
Nutritional Awareness
1 Credit HF
A concise course in human nutrition.  This course provides students with a basic understanding of the role of the major nutrient groups and the importance of diet and exercise in health and disease prevention. Essential information needed for students to become informed consumers in the areas of food selection and preparation will be included.

AHS 111
Introduction to Patient Care Skills & Health Career Exploration
3 Credits Fall HF
Employs a care based learning methodology through life-sized simulation and explores a variety of career options with common basic skills related to health care occupations.  Students will learn vital signs, sterile techniques, handling of body fluids, and a basic introduction to:  body mechanics, proper chart documentation; ethics; professionalism; cultural diversity; communication skills; internet exploration techniques; and career exploration related to health care occupations.  Two lecture hours and two lab hours per week.
Skills prerequisite:  ENG 010
Skills co-requisite:  ENG 020 and ENG 060 or permission of the instructor.

AHS 115
Fundamentals of Human Disease
.
3 Credits SC
An introduction to human disease.  Topics include definition, etiology (cause), clinical findings (signs and symptoms) and treatment of a variety of human diseases and disorders. 
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisites: College prep high school biology with a C or better within 5 years or BIO 101, BIO 105 or BIO 150.

AHS 121
Essentials of Pharmacology
3 Credits Spring SC/ns
An introduction to the study of drugs.  This course coves how various medications interact with human bodily functions in the treatment or prevention of illness.
Skills prerequisite:  ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Co-requisite:  MAT 028A.

AHS 129
Medical Terminology
3 Credits
SC
The development of an extensive medical vocabulary. The course addresses the medical terms associated with body systems, including names, functions, malfunctions, and diseases.  Terminology covering diagnosis, treatment, and medications is also covered.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Recommendation: High school or college biology, or anatomy and physiology.

AHS 131
Orientation to the Musculoskeletal System
2 Credits
Interactive orientation to palpation and knowledge of the structure and basic physiology of the musculoskeletal system. Students will be working with anatomical skeletons, lab partners, drawings, observation, and lectures. Students will develop a working familiarity of bones and bony landmarks, muscle origins, insertions and actions, and joint dynamics. This  course  will  include  one hour of lecture and two hours of hands-on supervised laboratory experience a week
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020 and ENG 060

AHS 142
Exercise Science
3  Credits
HF CC-CT
A comprehensive three-credit  course  designed  to  teach  students the overall basics of exercise  physiology  and mechanics  of  exercise movement .  Anatomy as it relates to exercise will be taught in depth in conjunction with movement terminology. Students will also learn practical methodology for exercise physical evaluation.

AHS 148
Responding to Medical Emergencies
2 Credits HF CC-CT
The theory and practice of rescue skills used in emergency situations. The purpose of this course is to prepare rescuers with the knowledge and skills necessary to sustain life and minimize injury or sudden illness. Successful completion yields a two year American Red Cross certification in CPR/AED for the professional rescuer and first aid. Students may be required to pay an additional fee to the American Red Cross for supplies. A ten-week course.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020

AHS 150
Introduction to Nutrition
3 Credits SC/ns
A focus on the fundamental principles and practices essential in nutrition to maintain health. This course emphasizes improvement of nutritional status through proper diet.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Recommendation: High school or college biology.

AHS 155
Stress and Your Health
3 Credits HF
A comprehensive survey of the effects of stress on human health and physiology. This course identifies the effects of stress  on major body systems and examines  the  role  of  exercise,  nutrition and  relaxation  in  stress  reduction  and prevention.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

AHS 162
Applied Visceral Anatomy
2 Credits Spring HF
An overview of how   visceral   anatomy   interacts   with   everyday life   functions.   This   course   is   designed   to emphasize how basic physiology of the visceral system can be observed and demonstrated through hands on activities and  how  external factors  can  affect  the  visceral  systems.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: BIO 150 or BIO 201.

AHS 170
Medical Assisting Studies
32 Credits HF
An instructional course completed at McCann Technical School that prepares individuals to function in a physician's office or health care facility performing business administration and clinical medical office skills. Business aspects include correspondence, medical records management, insurance billing, appointment scheduling, and medical transcription. Clinical aspects include preparation of the patient for and assisting with physical examination and treatment, assessment of vital signs, patient education, preparation and administration of medications, routine laboratory procedures including blood drawing, and performing electrocardiography . This course only applies to matriculated students in the Health Science - Medical Assisting option

AHS 171
Surgical Technology Studies
32 Credits HF
An instructional course completed at McCann Technical School that prepares the beginning practitioner with the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to provide services in the operating room as a Surgical Technologist. Instruction includes components of the basic sciences, safe patient care, operating room techniques, surgical procedures, and clinical practice.  This course only applies to matriculated students in the Health Science - Surgical Technology option.

AHS 172
Dental Assisting Studies
32 Credits HF
An instructional  course  completed  at  McCann  Technical  School that prepares  individuals  to  assist  a dentist  at  chair  side . This preparation includes office procedures, performance of radio- graphic techniques and selected laboratory tasks. McCann graduates are eligible to sit for the Certified Dental Assistant (CDA) examination as administered by the Dental Assisting National Board (DANB). This course includes academic and clinical procedure preparation, and general and specialty externships in carefully selected private dental offices and clinics. This course only applies to matriculated students in the Health Science - Dental Assisting option.

AHS 220
Principles of Fitness Components
3 Credits
An  in-depth  critical  look  at  the  individual  fitness  components  and their  significance  to  cultural  lifestyle  and  overall personal  health .

The focus will be not only on the scientific background of each component but on the sociocultural aspects as well. Specific components to be addressed will include body composition, flexibility, cardiovascular conditioning and muscular strength and endurance.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: PED 180 or permission of the instructor.
Recommended: BIO 150 or a background in human anatomy.

AHS 230
Pathophysiology
3 Credits SC/ns
An introduction to the various types of human diseases. Topics include the definition, etiology, pathophysiology, clinical findings, diagnosis,   prognosis,   management,   and   possible   complications of a variety of human diseases.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: BIO 101 and 102 or BIO 201 and 202, or permission of the instructor.

AHS 235
Fitness Program Planning
3 Credits
An  exploration  of  the  steps  involved  in  preparation,   development, implementation and evaluation  of  fitness program  design . The focus will be on program planning and development for community-based fitness clubs and work site settings.  Students will be required to plan a fitness program of their own as part of the coursework.
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisites: PED 170 or a strong background in exercise and permission of the instructor.

AHS 238
Mind/Body Theory and Methods
3 Credits HF
An exploration of a variety of techniques that combine a strong emphasis in utilizing both the mind and the body simultaneously. Practices such as Yoga, Pilates, Tai Chi and walking meditation will be included in this course.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

AHS 275
Independent Study in Allied Health
1-4 Credits

Independent study for students with a foundation in the field. Student and instructor determine the project and the number of credits to be earned. A formal problem, a review of the literature, field work or internship, and written or oral presentations  are often  involved   Regularly  scheduled  meetings   between   student and  instructor  are  required.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

AHS 297
Special Topics in Health Care
1-3 Credits
Specific course content in current health care issues as deter- mined by the allied health department. Details are included in pre-registration   materials.

Anthropology

ANT 101
Cultural Anthropology
3 Credits SS/ss
An  introduction  to  the  peoples  and  cultures  of  the  world .  This course  investigates  the  factors  that  produce different  ways  of life,  belief  systems,  and  behavior  patterns,  and  examines  what is considered 'normal' from the perspective of different cultures.
Skills prerequisite:  ENG 010.

ANT 102
Physical Anthropology
3 Credits Spring SS/ss
An introduction to human evolutionary studies and the biological history of the human species. Includes surveys of the human fossil record great ape studies, prehistoric archaeology, and modern human biodiversity. Additional topics touched upon include forensic anthropology, human genetics, dating methods, and human skeletal anatomy.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 010.

ANT 125
American Indians
3 Credits SS/ss CC-WC CC-CT
A survey of the native peoples of the Americas.  Language, religion, gender, kinship,  economics,  politics,  history,  and identity are examined, as well as the  relationship  of  the  native  peoples with  non-Indians
Skills Prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Recommendation: ANT 101.

ANT 197
Special Topics in Anthropology
3 Credits SS/ss
Specific   course   content   at   the   discretion   of   the   department. Details are in preregistration materials.

ANT 275
Independent Study in Anthropology
1-3 Credits
Tutorials  in  which  student  and  instructor  determine  a  project  and the number of credits to be earned. 
Prerequisite: One previous course in anthropology and the permission of the instructor.

ANT 276
Independent Study in Anthropology II
1-3 Credits
Tutorials  in  which  student  and  instructor  determine  a  project  and the number of credits to be earned. 
Prerequisite: One previous course in anthropology and permission of the instructor.

Atmospheric Science

ATM 126
Extreme Weather: Past, Present and Future
3 Credits SC/ns
A study of extreme weather events (hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, blizzards, drought, etc.) from a variety of perspectives. The course examines the atmospheric processes involved in the formation, evolution and destruction caused by these events as well as the human impact in the region affected. Historic cases and real-time events will be utilized to illustrate these processes and impacts. In addition, the possible effect  of  global  warming  on  the  number and severity  of  different  extreme  weather  events  will  be  studied . In particular, evidence will be examined to help determine if there has already been a change over the past century and whether further, perhaps more profound change is likely in the future. The physical basis for these changes and possible impacts on human society will also be examined. 
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

ATM 135
Introduction to Astronomy and the Night Sky
3 Credits As Needed SC/ns
An  introduction  to  contemporary  astronomy  with  attention  to  lightoptic  visible  objects.   In  addition  to
learning  northern  hemisphere constellations,  students  will  learn  about  astronomical  time  and measurement  life cycles  of  stars,  nebulae,  galaxies,  comets, auroras  and  eclipses .  Details about solar system dynamics, the moon, our planets, the sun and their impact on earth’s ecology and life cycles will also be discussed. In addition, basic techniques of astronomical photography are covered. 
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020, ENG 060 and MAT 018.

ATM 145
Introduction to Meteorology
4 Credits ■ As Needed SC/ls
An introduction to the science of the atmosphere. This course will present an introduction to the physical processes governing the weather that we observe every day and the weather and climate issues that are so important to the human condition. This course is intended as both a general information course for both science and non-science oriented students and an introduction to meteorology for those students who may be considering a career in the atmospheric sciences. 
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

ATM 209
Weather Workshop
1 Credit
Intended to complement coursework in ATM-210 as well as provide training for upper-level weather analysis and forecasting classes to be taken upon transfer to baccalaureate programs in Atmospheric Science. The course is designed  to  teach  students how  to  decode,  interpret  and  understand  weather  data  and  apply it to real world weather scenarios. 
Prerequisites: ATM 145, ENM 151 and PHY 101.
Co-requisite: ATM 210.

ATM 210
Atmospheric Structure, Thermodynamics Circulation
3 Credits SC/ns CC-CT
A technical survey of the atmosphere with application of physical and mathematical concepts. The course is designed to explore many  of  the  concepts  learned  in  Introduction  to  Meteorology  in a more detailed manner by applying learned physics and mathematical principles to evaluate and understand the fundamental properties and behaviors of earth's atmosphere  that  govern weather  and  climate.
Prerequisites: ATM 145, ENM 151 and PHY 101.
Co-requisite: ATM 209.

BCC Student Success

BCC 101
Student Success Seminar
1 Credit
A seminar designed to acquaint first semester students to higher education. This  course  will  encourage  students’ personal  growth in a supportive environment, and enhance their opportunity for academic  success  by  building  a sense of  connectedness  to  BCC.

BCC 125
Your Path to Success:
Life Skills & College Transition
1 Credit
A team-taught seminar designed to develop the skills necessary for personal, academic and career success. Topics include values clarification, goal setting, problem solving, communication skills, meaningful learning, stress and time management, conflict resolution,   career   exploration,   and   interpersonal   skills   development. Pass/No Pass grading.

Biology

BIO 101
General Biology I
4 Credits SC/ls CC-CT
An introduction to biology, exploring life forms and their evolution. Topics include cells, metabolism, photosynthesis, and heredity. Weekly laboratory.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: High school biology or BIO 105 recommended.

BIO 102
General Biology II
4 Credits Spring and Summer SC/ls CC-QR
A continuation of BIO 101. This course focuses on the diversity of living things and their interdependence. It includes the classification of organisms, their component systems, and their role in the world ecosystem. Weekly laboratory. 
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: BIO 101 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 105
Fundamentals of Biology
4 Credits SC
Intended  for  students  with  limited  science  backgrounds  planning to  enter  more  advanced  biology  courses  Studies cellular biology of animal and plant cells. Introduces the interrelationships of living systems. Weekly labs. This course does not fulfill the natural/ physical lab science requirement for AA programs.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

BIO 109
Introductory Ecology
4 Credits Fall SC/ls
Primarily theoretical ecology. Topics covered in lecture and laboratory include ecosystem concept, ecological energetics, biogeochemical cycling, limiting factors, habitat types, and ecological succession. 
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

BIO 110
Introductory Ecology II
4 Credits Spring SC/ls
A continuation of BIO 109 which may be elected separately. Lecture and laboratory topics include community dynamics, climatology, population ecology, behavioral ecology, and environmental health. 
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

BIO 111
Introduction to Botany
4 Credits Spring SC/ls
The biology, ecology, and taxonomy of plants and their role in human civilization. Structure and function, metabolism, growth and physiology, genetics, evolution, and adaptations are included. Laboratories emphasize structure, function, growth, and taxonomy. A plant collection may be required. 
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

BIO 112
Zoology
4 Credits Fall SC/ls
An introduction to the organization and evolution of animals, including invertebrates and vertebrates.  This   course examines how various animal groups have solved the biological problems common to all life. 
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

BIO 116
Animal Care Practicum
2 Credits Spring
A  sponsored  work  program  in  one  or  two  areas  of  concentration . Clinical experience will be provided for students training for veterinary assistant positions; sponsors at working farms will offer training in large animal care and management.  Approximately 300 hours (20 hours/week) of work experience is required.
Prerequisite:  MAT 028B or equivalency and permission of program advisor.

BIO 117
Animal Care Seminar
1 Credit Spring CC-WC
An informal seminar program dedicated to discussion and ex- change of ideas in applied animal care fields. The course provides an  opportunity  to  challenge  and  evaluate  the  thinking of  other  participants,  with  lectures  and presentations  by  area professionals.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

BIO 118
Animal Behavior
3 Credits Fall
An introduction to the concepts of animal behavior. The emphasis is on behavioral evolution, the physiology of behavior, and animal behavior encountered in working with both wild and domestic species. This course is open to any student interested in learning more about animals.
Skills prerequisite:  ENG 020 and ENG 060.

BIO 119
Animal Nutrition & Health
4 Credits
An introduction to domestic animal nutrition and health care. Topics include basic nutritional requirements, digestive processes, common feeding practices, routine animal health maintenance, and domestic animal pathology and parasitology.
Prerequisite: BIO 103 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 132
B
iological Laboratory Techniques
1 Credit SC
A survey of fundamental biological laboratory techniques.  The course   covers   laboratory   safety,   data   recording and  documentation,   use   of   common   laboratory   equipment,   preparation   of solutions,   compound   separation   and   identification,   microscopy, microbiological techniques and experimental design. 
 Prerequisite:  BIO 101  or  BIO 105  or  permission  of  the instructor.

BIO 150
Introduction to the Human Body
4 Credits
An introduction to the structure and function of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the homeostatic mechanisms that serve to maintain normal organ function and the diseases and disorders that result from loss of this balance. For LPN students and others who do not need a laboratory science.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: High school college prep biology within the past five years with a 73 or better or, BIO 101, or BIO 105.

BIO 180
The Biology of Sex & Gender
3 Credits SC/ns CC-CT CC-WC
An exploration of the biological processes that direct the sexual specialization of the body and brain. Students will review the scientific evidence for sex based differences in human physiology, health, behavior and cognition. Case histories, essays and articles will be used to explore current controversies in gender biology including; the biological basis of sexual orientation and gender identity; and the ethical treatment of intersexed and transgendered   individuals. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 201
Anatomy & Physiology
4 Credits SC/ls CC-CT
The structure of the  human  body,  including  microscopic  anatomy, and the principals involved  in  the  functioning  and  integration  of the various body systems . This course covers, cells, tissues, the integumentary, skeletal, articular, muscular, nervous and sensory systems.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: BIO 105 with a minimum grade of “B” or 
BIO 101 with a minimum grade of C or permission of the instructor.

BIO 202
Anatomy and Physiology II
4 Credits SC/ls CC-CT
A continuation of BIO 201. This course covers the endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems, as well as fluids and electrolytes.
Prerequisite: BIO 201 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 207
Microbiology
4 Credits SC/ls
An introduction to   bacteria   and   other   microorganisms-their scope, morphology, cultural characteristics, and metabolism-and to immunology and the role of the microorganism in health and disease. Additional topics include viruses and cancer, serology, theories of antibody  formation,  and  the  immune  response  as related  to  transplants  and  autoimmune  diseases. 
Prerequisite: BIO 101 or BIO 105 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 208
Ornithology
4 Credits As Needed SC/ls
An introduction to the study of birds-their identification, relation- ships, life histories, and ecological importance. This course is suitable for both science and non-science majors and includes weekly field trips during appropriate weather.

BIO 230
Biotechnology
4 Credits SC/ls
An introduction to biotechnology including medical, agricultural, environmental, and chemical biotechnology. Additional topics include bioinformatics, traditional food production, and bioethics. The course   is   designed   to   provide biotechnological   knowledge as well as practical skills preparing students for professions or further studies in the field. 
Prerequisites: BIO 101, BIO 132, CHM 101 or CHM 150 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 236
Evolution
3 Credits All Terms SC/ns
A survey of 3 .5 billion years of evolution. The course focuses on concepts by Darwin and Wallace but explores earlier models and later developments as well. In addition to covering biological foundations, the course explores relationships between evolution and the humanities and examines practical   applications in   science and everyday life. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 236L
Evolution Lab
1 Credit SC
A lab to accompany BIO 236 (Evolution). The lab is designed to illustrate, reinforce, and apply the content of BIO 236 through seminar discussions, laboratory exercises, experiments and field trips. 
Co-requisite: BIO 236 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 275
Independent Study in Life Sciences I
1-4Credits
Independent study for students with a foundation in the field. The student and instructor determine the project to be worked on and the number of credits to be earned. The area of study may be in biology, botany, genetics, microbiology, ornithology, or zoology. Regularly scheduled meetings between student and instructor are required. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair or program advisor.

BIO 276
Independent Study in Life Sciences II
1-4 Credits
Independent study for students with a foundation in the field. The student and instructor determine the project to be worked on and the number of credits to be earned. The area of study may be in biology, genetics, microbiology, ornithology, or zoology. Regularly scheduled meetings between student and instructor are required .Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair or program advisor.

Business

BUS 105
Business Mathematics
3 Credits
A study of mathematical problems often encountered by employees and consumers. Problems relate to banking, retailing, finance, taxation, and payroll.
Skills prerequisite: MAT 018C.

BUS 107
Fundamentals of Business
3 Credits CC-CT CC-WC
An introduction to the environment and operation of business organizations. Course topics include the social and economic environment of business; types of business organizations; and business activities such as management, finance, and marketing. A term project is required. 
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.

BUS 111
Principles of Accounting I
3 Credits
An integration of basic accounting theory and its application, including the complete cycle of both service and merchandising businesses. This course covers financial statements, internal control, special accounting systems, and cash control.  A substantial time commitment is required.
Skills prerequisite: MAT 018C and ENG 020.

BUS 112
Principles of Accounting II
3 Credits
A continuation of BUS 111. This course covers internal control of cash, inventory systems and valuation, plant asset disposal and depreciation, and principles and concepts. It also emphasizes accounting for partnerships and the organization and operation of corporations, including dividends, stockholders’ equity,   earnings, and financial statement analysis. Computer spreadsheet applications are used in problem solving. A substantial time commitment is required. 
Prerequisite: C or better in BUS 111.

BUS 139
Introduction to Personal Finance
3 Credits
Provides  a  hands  on,  interactive  approach  to  life  skills  management of personal finance and insurance . Students will be exposed to strategies for personal financial planning, successful money management (savings strategies, managing  debt),  and  personal risk management  (life,  health,  property  and  casualty  insurance) . As part of a course project, students will create their own personal financial plan.

BUS 206
Principles of Management
3 Credits
A study of management theory and application which examines classical, contemporary, and emerging theories in conjunction with productivity and human motivation. Course content includes the functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling, and emphasizes the skills required for managerial success. Team case presentations provide the basis for class discussion. 
Prerequisite: BUS 107.

BUS 208
Principles of Marketing
3 Credits
An exploration of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and processes required  to  create  customer  satisfaction  profitably  by  building value-laden  relationships  in  an  ever  changing  world .  Students consider emerging trends and forces impacting marketing opportunities and strategies which apply to the four major principles of product, pricing, distribution, and promotion; marketing management in the global market; and social responsibility . Team case presentations provide the basis for class discussion. 
Prerequisite:  BUS 107 or permission of the instructor.

BUS 219
Organizational Behavior
3 Credits
An examination of the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations. Such topics as human motivation, job satisfaction and stress, perception and attitudes, change, conflict resolution, influence, leadership, corporate culture, power, and status are explored. Case studies place students in the role of decision maker, and form the basis for discussion.
Prerequisite: BUS 107.

BUS 220
Managerial Accounting
3 Credits As Needed CC-CT CC-QR
An  examination  of  the  process  of  gathering  and  analyzing  ac- counting data for use by managers in planning, decision making, and  controlling .  This course uses computerized spreadsheet applications in analyzing the performance of product lines and other segments of a firm, pricing strategy, cost-volume-profit relationships, budgeting, and capital investment decisions.
Prerequisite: C or better in BUS 112 or permission of the instructor.

BUS 247
Business Communications
3 Credits CC-WC
An examination of communication in the business organization, with emphasis on techniques of effective writing applied to letters, reports, and memoranda. Other topics may include resume preparation and cross- cultural written communication. 
Prerequisite: C or better in ENG 101 or ENG 103, or permission of the instructor.

BUS 251
Business Law I
3 Credits
An introduction to the legal principles of business. This course concentrates on the essential elements of legally enforceable contracts, personal property and bailments, agency and employment law, and an overview of the Uniform Commercial Code as it applies to the sale of goods. An introduction to the American legal system and to tort law is also included. The text is supplemented by case discussions. 
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.

BUS 255
Principles of Finance
3 Credits As Needed CC-CT CC-QR
An examination of the acquisition of funds in today’s corporations. Topics include shareholder wealth maximization concepts, working capital management, alternative forms of short- and long-term funds, financial analysis, mergers, leveraged buy-outs (LBOs),  and  capital  budgeting .
Prerequisite: BUS 111.

BUS 260
Business Ethics
3 Credits hu
A  study  of  the  role  of  ethical  behavior  in  business .  Students learn about the values and behavior they most admire in people, organizations and society. One focus is that of determining the criteria most often used in ethical decision making. Another is on organizations that prosper and decline as a result of their ethical decisions.  Through  classroom  discussion  and  short  written  assignments,  students  discover  or  reinforce  their  personal  values and learn how to improve their business environments .
Prerequisite:  Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

BUS 275
Independent Study in Business
1-4 Credits
Independent study for students with a foundation in the field. Student and instructor determine the project and the number of credits to be earned. A formal problem, a review of the literature, field work, and written or verbal presentations are often involved. Regularly scheduled meetings between student and instructor are required. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

BUS 285
Cooperative Education in Business I
1-4 Credits
See Experiential Learning (EXL).

BUS 286
Cooperative Education in Business II
1-4 Credits
See Experiential Learning (EXL).

BUS 297
Special Topics in Business
1-4 Credits
Specific   course   content   at   the   discretion   of   the   department. Details are in pre-registration materials.

Business Software Systems

BSS 102
Microsoft Word
3 Credits
An introduction to word processing. This applications course emphasizes the  basic  features  of word  processing,  formatting, tables, mail merge, formatting long documents using advanced features such as styles,  outlines  and  master documents,  and indexes and table of contents . After completion of this course, students may  become  Microsoft Certified  by  taking  the  Word Expert  Microsoft  Office  Specialist  Exam .

BSS105
Microsoft PowerPoint
3 Credits
An introduction to presentation software. This applications course emphasizes the basics of creating and editing presentations and publications, using and modifying visuals to enhance presentations, packaging presentations and creating macros. After completion of this course, students may become Microsoft Certified by taking the PowerPoint Expert Microsoft Office Specialist Exam.

BSS 115
Computer Keyboarding

3 Credits
For students with no keyboarding experience as well as those looking to upgrade their keyboarding skill. An individualized training program will be assigned using a specialized keyboarding software program that will identify students' level of skill. This course also includes proofreading and the formatting of letters, tables and reports.

BSS 201
Microsoft Excel
3 Credits
An introduction to spreadsheets. This applications course emphasizes the basics of creating and editing worksheets, using formulas and functions, working with multiple worksheets, creating charts, and using templates and macros. After completion of this course, students may become Microsoft Certified by taking the Excel Expert Microsoft Office Specialist Exam . 
Skills prerequisite: MAT 018C.
Prerequisites: BSS 101 or BSS 102 or BSS 105 or BSS 202 or CIS 102 or permission of the instructor.

BSS 202
Microsoft Access
3 Credit
An introduction to database. This applications course emphasizes the basics of creating  and  maintaining  databases,  managing reports  and  forms,  querying  databases,  and  creating   macros . After completion of this course, students may become Microsoft Certified by taking the Access Core Microsoft Office Specialist Exam.
Prerequisites: BSS 101 or BSS 102 or BSS 105 or BSS 201 or CIS 102 or permission of the instructor.

Chemistry  

CHM 101
Introductory Chemistry I
4  Credits   Summer  and  Fall  SC/ls
A laboratory science course for students planning to transfer . Topics include formulas, equations, stoichiometry, oxidation- reduction, gases, liquids and solids, thermochemistry, electronic structure, periodic table and bonding.
Prerequisite: One year of algebra or permission of the instructor.

CHM 102
Introductory Chemistry II
4 Credits Spring and Summer SC/ls CC-QR
A continuation of CHM 101. This course covers kinetics, acid, base and precipitation equilibria, coordination compounds, thermodynamics,   electrochemistry,   nuclear,   metal,   non-metal and organic chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHM 101 or permission of the instructor.

CHM 150
Essentials of Chemistry
3 Credits SC CC-QR
For students who need review before entering a health-related program or Chemistry 101 . Topics covered include the metric system, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, mole and mass calculations, gas laws, radioactivity, solutions, concentrations, acids, bases, and buffer systems. 
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Skills co-requisite: MAT 028A.

CHM 201
Organic Chemistry
4 Credits Fall SC/ls CC-CT CC-WC
A  one-semester  course  suitable  for  allied  health  majors .  Topics include alkanes, nomenclature, stereochemistry, the major functional groups of biological molecules (alkenes, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes and ketones, acids and derivatives, and amines) and simple biomolecules (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins).
Prerequisite: CHM 101 and CHM 102.

CHM 202
Organic Chemistry II

4 Credits ■ Spring ■ SC/ls
A continuation of CHM 201 . Topics include alkyl and aryl halides, aromaticity, arenes, phenols, carbanions, NMR and IR, substitution, solvent role, mechanisms, rearrangements, and macro- molecules .  Extensive  work  solving  problems .
Prerequisite: CHM 201.

CHM 275
Independent Study in Chemistry

1-4 Credits
Tutorials in which student and  instructor  determine  the  project and the number of credits to be earned subject to approval by the department  chair .

 

 

Communication


COM 104
Introduction to Interpersonal Communication
3 Credits ■ CO/hu ■ CC-OC ■ CC-WC

A   study   of   interpersonal   communication   designed   to   examine, develop,   strengthen,   and   maintain interpersonal   relationships . Discussions   focus   on   nonverbal   (proxemics,   territoriality)   and verbal   (semantics,   paralanguage)   communication .   Presentations, class  discussions,  and  group  techniques  are  used  in  class .      Skills  prerequisite:  ENG  020  and  ENG  060.

COM 105
Introduction to Oral Communication

3 Credits ■ CO/hu ■ CC-OC
An  introduction  to  basic   principles   of   speaking   in   public   and the development of confidence and poise in the speaker . Per- formances include informative and persuasive speeches, and speeches using visual aids . The course also encompasses basic research,  analysis,  and  outlining .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

COM 106
Introduction to Oral Interpretation of Literature

3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ CO/hu ■ CC-OC
Performance techniques  through  reading  various  forms  of literature to an audience . A written analysis is required for each reading .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

COM 107
Introduction to Oral Communication in Business

3  Credits  ■  As  Needed  ■  CO/hu  ■  CC-OC  ■  CC-WC
A study of speaking skills appropriate to a business setting .  This course includes presenting oral reports, conducting information- gathering interviews,  establishing  goodwill  through  motivational talks,  and  participating  in  group decision  making .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

 

CIS


CIS 102
Fu
ndamental Computer Literacy
4  Credits
An experiential computer literacy course using common microcomputer applications . The course covers word processing, spreadsheets, presentation software, file management and Internet/Web search skills using a hands-on approach to problem solving in the computer laboratory . The emphasis is on applying these software packages as decision-making tools to real world problems . An online course management system will be used to provide instructional support via the Internet .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and MAT 018C.

CIS 124
C++ Programming I
4 Credits ■ CC-QR
A course in microcomputer software design using objects . This course is an introduction to C++ and object-oriented program- ming . Topics include objects, control structures, functions, arrays, and structs . An online course management system will be used to provide instructional support via the Internet . Note: Credit is not granted for both CIS 124 and ENT 183 .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and MAT 029, or permission of the instructor.

CIS 125
C++ Programming II
4 Credits ■ CC-CT ■ CC-QR
A continuation of CIS 124 . Topics include pointers, string manipu- lation, structured data,  objects,  classes,  inheritance, polymor- phism, advanced file  handling,  virtual  functions  and  recursion . An online course management system will be used to provide instructional  lab  support  via  the  Internet .
Prerequisite: C+ or better in CIS 124 and MAT 102 or permission of the instructor.

CIS 153
Systems Operations
4 Credits
A hands-on course which introduces students to  computer  hard- ware, PC operating system software, and software installation . Students will examine internal  components  of  a  PC,  giving  them the ability to  confidently  upgrade, troubleshoot  and/or  repair  a PC . The opportunity to partition and format hard drives as well as

install and upgrade various operating systems will be provided . The course demonstrates methods for end-user, diagnostic evaluation using commercially available software packages necessary in PC maintenance . An online course management system may be used to provide instructional support via the internet .
Co-requisite:  CIS 102  or  permission  of  the  instructor.

CIS 155
Web Development
3  Credits
An experiential web programming course using common web programming languages and their real world applications . Concepts and programming languages covered include: document structure (xHTML), formal layout (CSS), interactivity (JavaScript), and structure of content (xML) . Students learn how to organize and present information on the World Wide Web .
Skills prerequisite: CIS 102 or permission of the instructor.

CIS 180
Introduction to Networks
4  Credits
First course of a four  course  sequence  designed  to  provide students  with  classroom  and  laboratory   experience  in  current and emerging networking technologies while beginning student's preparation for professional  certifications . This  course  introduces the   architecture,   structure,   functions,   components,   and   models of the Internet and other computer networks . The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals  of  Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for advancement in networking . By the end of the course, students  will  be  able  to  build  simple   LANs,   perform basic configurations of routers and switches, and implement IP addressing  schemes .
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020, ENG 060 and MAT 029 or permission of the instructor.
Recommendation: CIS 153.

CIS 181
Routing and Switching Essentials
4 Credits
Second course of a four course  sequence  describes  the  architecture, components and operation of routers and switches in a small network . Students learn  how  to  configure  a  router  and  a  switch for basic functionality .  By  the end  of  this  course,  students  will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with routing protocols, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN  routing  in  both  IPv4  and  IPv6  networks .  In  addition, students  will   be   prepared   for   the   Entry   Networking  Technician Certification   (CCENT) .
Prerequisite: C+ or better in CIS 180 or permission of the instructor.

CIS 203
Systems Design
3  Credits ■ Spring
The technical aspects of systems design such as the systems perspective, techniques for analyzing systems, systems control, documentation, file design, organizing a data processing department, and making feasibility studies . Both manual and automated systems are studied .
Prerequisite: BSS 202 or permission of the instructor.

CIS 211
Data Structures
4  Credits ■ Fall ■ CC-CT ■ CC-QR
A course concerned with the  representation  of  data  structures and the design and analysis of algorithms that manipulate these structures . Topics include arrays, stacks, queues, deques, lists, linked lists, trees, recursion, hashing, searching, and sorting techniques  .
Prerequisite: C+ or better in CIS 125 or permission of the instructor.

CIS 231
Computer Science I with Java
4 Credits ■ CC-CT ■ CC-QR
A study of computer programming using the Java language . The course will cover creating stand-alone applications and applets . Topics include control structures, Graphical User Interface (GUI) design, object oriented design, the use of Java class libraries, user-defined  methods  and  classes,  inheritance,  exception   handling and graphics .
Prerequisite: C+ or better in CIS 124 and MAT 102 or permission of the instructor.

CIS 232
Computer Science II With Java
4 Credits ■ CC-CT ■ CC-QR
A continuation of CIS 231 . Topics include classes and objects with I/O serialization, collections and utilities, multi-threading, advanced GUI's, Java beans and relational databases .
Prerequisite: C+ or better in CIS 231 or permission of the instructor.

CIS 240
Scaling Networks
4 Credits
Third course of a four course sequence provides the in depth exposure to the architecture,  components,  and operations of routers and switches in larger and more complex  networks .  Stu- dents learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality . By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and  resolve common issues with routing protocols, and spanning tree protocols in IPv4 and IPv6 networks . Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement a Wireless LAN in a small-to-medium  network.
Prerequisites: C+ or better in CIS 181 or permission of the instructor.

CIS 241
Connecting Networks
4 Credits ■ CC-CT
Discusses the Wide Area Network (WAN)  technologies  and network services required by converged  applications  in  a complex network . The course enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies  to meet network requirements . Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common  issues  with data link protocols . Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement virtual private network  (VPN) operations in a complex network . Completing this course of the  four course sequence will prepare the student for the Associate-level certifications  in  Networking  (CCNA) .
Prerequisites: C+ or better in CIS 240 or permission of the instructor.

CIS 255
Fundamentals of Wireless LANs
3 Credits
An introduction to the  design,  planning,  implementation,  operation and troubleshooting of wireless networks .  This course provides a comprehensive overview of technologies, security, and design best practices with particular emphasis on hands-on skills .
Prerequisite: CIS 180,  CIS  181  and  CIS  240,  or  permission  of the instructor.


CIS 275 
Independent Study
in Computer Information Systems
1-4 Credits
For students with a foundation in the field . Student and instructor determine the project and the number of credits to be earned . Literature search, field work, and written or oral reports may be involved . Regularly scheduled meetings between student and instructor  are  required .
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

CIS 297
Special Topics
in Computer Information Systems
3-4 Credits
Specific  course  content  and  prerequisites  vary  from  semester  to semester .  Details  are  in  pre-registration materials .

  

Criminal Justice

CRJ 105
Introduction to Criminal Justice
3 Credits ■ Fall and Spring
History,  development,  philosophy,  and   constitutional   aspects   of the U .S . criminal justice system . Emphasis will be on actual situations confronting police, prosecutors, judges, probation officers, correctional  officers  and  prison administrators,   parole   boards, and other practitioners in the field .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

  CRJ 108
Substance Abuse Education
3 Credits ■ Fall and Spring ■ HF • CC-OC
A  survey  of  alcohol  and  other  drug  use  in  America .  Designed  for a wide range of students, this  course  examines substance  abuse from several perspectives . These include: legal, physical/medical, psychological, social/cultural, and historical, plus new and existing models  for  prevention  and  treatment .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

CRJ 109
Police and Community Relations
3 Credits ■ Fall and Spring
A study of social and psychological factors which police must consider as they strive to enforce the law while maintaining a healthy relationship with the community . Critical issues discussed include the role and  image  of  the  police, discretion,  race,  prejudice,  ethics,  higher  education,  and  media .
Prerequisite: CRJ 105 or permission of the instructor.

CRJ 121
Criminal Law
3 Credits ■ Fall and Spring ■ CC-CT
An introduction to the American legal system, focusing on major categories of  crimes and  their punishments . Students   analyze legal  elements  through  case  studies .
Prerequisite: CRJ 105 or permission of the instructor. 

CRJ 123
Criminal Procedures
3 Credits ■ Fall and Spring ■ CC-CT ■ CC-WC
The criminal processes from investigation through  arrest, indictment, trial, and sentencing . This course covers procedural matters such as arrest, search and seizure, interrogation, wiretap- ping,  entrapment,  and  pre-trial  publicity .
Prerequisite: CRJ 105 or permission of the instructor.

CRJ 125
Juvenile Justice Process
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ CC-OC
The  causes,  control,  and  prevention   of   juvenile   delinquency . The focus will be on delinquency theories and the treatment of juveniles  within  the  criminal  justice  system .
Prerequisite: CRJ 105 and ENG 101.

CRJ 126
Criminal Investigation
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ CC-OC
A study  of  field  investigation  techniques .  Topics  include  conduct at  crime   scenes,   interview   and   interrogation techniques,   use of informants, techniques of surveillance, and  investigative procedures  .
Prerequisite: CRJ 105 or permission of the instructor.

CRJ 127
Correctional Process
3 Credits ■ Spring
An  examination  of  correctional  institutions  and  their  functions . Topics   include   prison   as   a   total   institution, characteristics   of various  types  of  institutions,  problems  in  rehabilitation,  analysis  of the  prison  community, adjustment  to  prison  life  by  personnel  and inmates,  and  the  impact  of  institutionalization  on  the  offender . Prerequisite:   CRJ 105.

CRJ 200
Introduction to Criminology
3 Credits ■ Spring
An introductory study  of  criminal  behavior .  This  course  will  focus on the changes in the crime rate, law,  theory,  and knowledge about the major forms of crime .
Prerequisite: CRJ 105 and ENG 101.

CRJ 201
Criminal Justice Field Work Seminar
3 Credits • As Needed • CC-CT
An opportunity  to  develop  broader  knowledge  of  the  criminal justice system in operation . This course consists of fieldwork  in police  courts,  corrections,  and  other   criminal   justice   agencies, plus a weekly seminar for sharing experiences and building under- standing of criminal justice as a system .
Prerequisite: CRJ 105, 108, 127, and ENG 101, and permission of the program advisor.

 

Culinary

 

CUL 101
Food Preparation I
2  Credits
A study of fundamental concepts, skills, and techniques involved in basic cookery . The course  includes  cooking theories,  ingredients, and procedures for preparing stocks, soups, thickening agents, grand sauces, and small sauces Breakfast and lunch cookery as well as organization skills and knife skills will be studied .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and MAT 018C.


CUL 102
Food Preparation II
2  Credits
A continuation of CUL 101. This course  reinforces  the  knowledge and skills learned in Food Preparation I which helps build confidence in techniques of basic cookery . Demonstrations and lectures cover vegetable  and  starch  cookery,  meat,  fish,  and poultry cookery . Emphasis is placed on the mastery of cooking techniques  such  as  roasting,  sautéing,  poaching,  braising,  and frying . The development of knife skills is re-emphasized .
Skills Prerequisites: ENG 020 and MAT 018C.
Prerequisite: CUL 101.

CUL 103
Kitchen Management
3  Credits
A  study  of  menu  development,  costing,  kitchen  organization, timing, and mise en place which focuses on gourmet and inter- national cuisines . Building on previous cooking courses, students will research and present a detailed project which will focus on course  objectives .  The  project  will  include  menu  development, cost analysis, meal preparation, and service reflective of a spe- cific cuisine . Meals will be prepared and served to the public .
Prerequisite:  CUL 102 and  HSP  112.
Corequisite: HSP 118 or permission of the department chair.

CUL 104
Baking
3 Credits ■ Fall
An  introduction  to  baking-breads  and  rolls,  cakes,  pies,  pastries, custards,  specialty  items,  and  decorative  work .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and MAT 018C.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Culinary Arts certificate program or permission of the instructor.

CUL 105
Garde Manger and Pantry
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ CC-WC
A comprehensive study of the fundamentals of pantry, garde manger (the management of cold foods), and cold-food preparation . The focus is on presenting food attractively . Salads, sandwiches, appetizers,   garnishes,   and   food decoration   are   emphasized . Decoration of foods in the buffet will also be studied . 
Prerequisite:  CUL  101,  CUL  102  and  enrollment  in  the  Culinary  Arts  certificate  program  or  permission of  the department   chair.


Early Childhood Education

 

ECE 101
Early Childhood Growth and Development
3 Credits ■ Fall
A study of child development from embryo through eight years including  maturational,  emotional,  intellectual-cognitive, verbal, and  social  factors .  This  course  stresses  the  understanding  of major theories of development and requires recording  observations of child behavior .

ECE 104
Introduction to Early Childhood Education
3 Credits ■ Fall
A course designed to provide an overall view of  programs  for young children and of current issues and trends . This course covers history of early education programs . It focuses on the developmental perspectives on the  young  child and  definition  of the  teacher,  setting,  and  curriculum .

ECE 107
Understanding and Guiding Children’s Behavior
3 Credits ■ As Needed
A course designed to assist students in acquiring insight  into young  children's  behavior .  Students  consider developmental issues,  individual  needs  and  styles,  and  group  dynamics  with young children . Course content focuses on appropriate  ways  to meet children's needs and effective strategies for identifying and intervening  in problem  behavior .
Prerequisite: ECE 101 or equivalent.
Recommendation: ECE 104.

ECE 122
Special Needs in Early Childhood Education
3 Credits ■ As Needed
The role of  the  teacher  in  identification,  evaluation,  and  planning for special needs in infant,  toddler,  and  preschool classrooms . The course covers the breadth of problems found in special needs child  care,  from  educational,  family, and  community  perspectives .

ECE 123
Early Childhood Education Practicum I
3 Credits ■ As Needed
An opportunity to integrate child development theory with teaching  practice  in  a  child  care,  nursery  school,  or kindergarten setting . The students work with children and develop skills and self-  assessment  in  all  aspects  of teaching .  Students  spend  a minimum of 150 hours supervised by a lead teacher at the site .
Prerequisite:   Permission   of   instructor.
Corequisite: ECE 124.

ECE 124
Early Childhood Education Seminar I
1 Credit ■ As Needed
A consideration of problems such as assessing growth, providing for the individual needs of children, group management, and problem-  solving .  Student  experiences  from  the  variety  of community programs and ages of children represented in their practicum placements provide the content of seminar discussion .
Prerequisite: One theory and one methods course in early childhood education or permission of the instructor.
Corequisite:  ECE  123.

ECE 154
Early Childhood Language and Literacy
3 Credits
An examination of the process and content  behind  the  development of literacy skills in children from birth to kindergarten .  This course will explore emergent literacy and focus on ways to implement  developmentally  appropriate learning  activities  in  the  areas of listening, speaking, writing and reading from both emergent literacy  and  research based  perspectives .
Prerequisite: ECE 101.

ECE 220
Infant and Toddler Care
3 Credits
A focused study of child care from birth through thirty-six months . Course includes history of infant and toddler care; types of pro- grams and when they are appropriate; nurturing environments; health and safety considerations; and developmental stages from cognitive, motor, language, and social skills perspectives .
Prerequisite: ECE 101 or PSY 204.


ECE 223
Early Childhood Education Practicum II
3  Credits
An   internship   with   increased   responsibility   and   involvement   in the  activities  of  an  early  childhood  program . Students  spend  a minimum of 150 hours supervised by a lead teacher at the site .
Prerequisite: ECE 123 and 124 or permission of the instructor.
Co-requisite: ECE 224.

ECE 224
Early Childhood Education Seminar II
1 Credit ■ CC-CT
A continuation of skill development and sharing of  field  experiences through  discussion  of  case  histories  and professional issues . Practical measures for implementing developmentally appropriate practices and creativity in young children are also discussed.
Co-requisite: ECE-223.

ECE 230
Supervision and Administration in Day Care

3 Credits ■ As Needed
Supervisory  and  administrative  concepts  and  skills  in  a  day  care setting .  Students  refine  observation  skills, techniques  for  effective  communication  with  staff,  and  ability  to  foster  professional growth  in  supervisees .  This course  covers  other  administrative issues  of  licensing,  personnel  records,  finance,  and  budgets . 
Prerequisite:   Permission   of   the   instructor   and   Office   for Children   Lead   Teacher   qualification.

ECE 241
Creativity - A Child’s Perspective
3 Credits ■ Spring
A focused study of creativity - what it is, why it is important, and how to foster it in young children . Students will explore leading philosophies including the Reggio Emilia approach and Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligence as they investigate how to integrate children's natural creative expression and play into the pre-school curriculum .
Prerequisite: ENG 101 or permission of the instructor.


ECE 265
Early Childhood Education Administration:
Staff Development
3 Credits
A systematic approach to implementing programmatic change in child  care  settings  through
staff  development  and  professional growth .  Students  will  utilize  practical  methods  and  techniques of assessment to gain an understanding of the respective roles of administrator and staff in fostering positive change within the context of organizational dynamics . Students must have access to a center- based child care program within which they can utilize the assessment tools that will be presented in the course .
Prerequisite:  OCCS  Lead  Teacher  qualified  with  one  year experience  in  a  center-based  child  care program  or  OCCS Director  I  or  Director  II  qualified.

ECE 275

Independent Study in Early Childhood Education
1-3 Credits
Independent study for students with a foundation in Early Child- hood Education . Student and instructor determine a project and the number of credits to be earned . Regularly scheduled meetings between the student and instructor are required.
Prerequisites: Previous coursework in Early Childhood Education and permission of the instructor.

Education

EDU 105
Foundations of Education
3 Credits
Examines the role education plays in the world and in individuals’ lives . Using a variety of teaching strategies  such  as texts,  films, news stories,  historical  documents  and  field  trips,  the  course covers the people, events and ideologies that have shaped educational practices . An emphasis will be placed on socioeconomic, political,  and  philosophical influences  on  schools .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.


Economics


ECO 150
W
orld Economy
3 Credits  ■ As  Needed  ■ SS/ss

An exploration of contemporary issues affecting world economy . Selected critical problem areas  such  as  food sufficiency,  oil  supply, population growth, and distribution of wealth will be examined against  a  background  of  culture, geography,  and  politics .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.

ECO 211
Principles of Microeconomics
3 Credits ■ SS/ss ■ CC-CT ■ CC-QR
An introduction to the theory and application of economic tools of analysis, to include the costs and rewards that cause individuals, firms and industries to demand and supply goods and services in the market . This course also explores the theories and realities of competitive and noncompetitive markets, and applies micro- economic tools of analysis to specific problems in areas such as energy, ecology, the global economy, and development theory .
Skills  prerequisite: ENG  020  and  MAT  018C.

ECO 212
Principles of Macroeconomics
3 Credits ■ SS/ss ■ CC-CT ■ CC-QR
An introduction to the theory and application of economic and political forces which affect the national economy . Major topics include gross domestic product and other measures of economic conditions; taxing, borrowing, and spending by various levels of government; Keynesian and neo-Keynesian models of equilibrium; and means used by the Federal Reserve system and the banking industry to stabilize the economy of the United States.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and MAT 018C.


 

Engineering/Technology

ENT 115
Introduction to Engineering
4 Credits Fall CC-QR
Designed to introduce first-year engineering students to the engineering profession and provide an overview of the various engineering disciplines. Students will complete various projects and activities that will include engineering analysis, the design process and evaluation, computer aided design, graphical design and working in a team environment. Visits to local industries will illustrate the various engineering disciplines and the possible career paths available.
Skill prerequisites: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Co-requisite: ENM 126 or permission of the instructor

ENT 122
Computer Aided Drafting/Design I
3 Credits As Needed CC-QR
An introduction to computer aided drafting and design (CADD). AutoCAD LT2000 is used to produce two-dimensional drawings. Various entry-level skills are taught using engineering, architectural and surveying examples. No prior computer or drafting experience is assumed; however, a basic understanding of drafting is recommended
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: MAT 028B or ENM 126 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 129
Introduction to Electricity and Electronics
4 Credits
CC-QR
An introduction to the world of electricity and electronics. This course is designed for the student with no previous electrical background. It covers circuit theory, electronic components and simple applications. In the laboratory  students will  build  circuits and  use  electronic  instruments  to  analyze  the  circuits .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: ENM 126 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 130
Introduction to Electronics
3 Credits As Needed
An introduction to the world of electricity and electronics, with laboratory demonstrations. Examples drawn from home appliances, personal computers, television, and health monitoring equipment make the content applicable to everyday life. (Not intended for students majoring in electrical engineering.)
Skills: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: ENM 126 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 135
Interpreting Engineering Drawings I
4  Credits  
 CC-QR
An introduction to the basics  for  interpreting  engineered  drawings . Topics include but are not limited to three view drawings, orthographic projections, sketching, types of lines, dimensioning, tolerancing, section views, auxiliary views, and   manufacturing with different material types.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Co-requisite: ENM 126 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 136
Interpreting Engineering Drawings II
4 Credits CC-QR
A continuation of ENT 135.  Additional  topics  include  but  are  not limited  to  chain  dimensioning,  drawings  for numerical  control,  assembly  drawings,  bill  of  materials,  welding  drawings  and  symbols, datum  features engineering  and  geometric  tolerancing  and feature  based  tolerancing
Prerequisite: ENT 135 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 151
Introduction to Manufacturing
4 Credits
CC-QR
An introduction to the metalworking processes including the setup and operation of metalworking tools. Topics covered will be manufacturing theory, tool geometry, blueprint reading, precision measurements, gages and inspection, as well as a basic introduction to computer aided drafting and automated machine tools.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Co-requisite: ENM 126 or permission of the instructor
.

ENT 152
Advanced Manufacturing:  Introduction to Computer Aided Design
4 Credits
A continuation of the theory of manufacturing planning and processes from ENT 151. Computer aided drafting/design (CAD) techniques are utilized to create two and three dimensional drawings from engineering drawings. 3-D solid modeling is introduced.
Prerequisite:   ENT 151   or   permission   of   the   instructor.

ENT 155
AC/DC Circuits
4 Credits

A trigonometry-based laboratory course designed to provide the technician with a solid understanding of AC/DC circuits and components. Topics include voltage, current resistance, reactance, sources,   components,   resonance   circuit laws   and   theorems. A weekly laboratory session will be required
Co-requisite: MAT 102.

ENT 161
Engineering Physics I: Mechanics
4 Credits
Fall SC/ls CC-QR
The beginning of a four-semester sequence for engineering, physics, architecture, and mathematics majors. With an emphasis on problem solving, this course covers classical mechanics, including particle kinematics, translational and rotational motion, the forces affecting motion, equilibrium, work and mechanical energy, impulse and momentum, and harmonic motion.
Co-requisite: ENM 151 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 162
Engineering Physics II: Fluids Heat & Sound
4 Credits
Spring SC/ls CC-CT
Elasticity, hydrostatics, and dynamics. This course also covers heat transfer, including thermal stresses, phase changes, state phenomena, and the relation between thermal and mechanical energy;  laws  of  thermodynamics,  thermodynamic  processes, cycles, and heat engines; entropy, mathematics of waves, standing waves, string and wind instruments, and the musical scale .
Prerequisite: ENM 151 and ENT 161.
Corequisite: ENM 152 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 185
Engineering Computer Applications
4 Credits
Applications of the personal computer to various engineering problems, including mathematical applications such as graphing techniques and statistical analysis, and engineering  applications such  as  computer  assisted  design  and  electrical  circuit  analysis . C language programming will be introduced.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: MAT 028B or ENM 126 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 203
Linear Circuit Analysis I
4 Credits Fall CC-QR
A first  course  in  electrical  circuit  theory  for engineering  students . Included are topics such as DC circuit theory, Kirchoff's Laws, Thevenin's and Norton's  equivalents,  super  position,  transient circuit analysis, RLC circuits and damping,  sinusoidal  analysis, complex forcing functions,  phasor  analysis,  and  power  in  AC circuits . Students use a variety of electronic equipment in a laboratory setting. Correlation between analytical and experimental results will be emphasized.
Prerequisite: Differential and integral calculus courses such as ENM 151 and ENM 152 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 204
Linear Circuit Analysis II
4 Credits
Spring CC-QR
A continuation  of  ENT  203  with  an  emphasis  placed  on  the  use of Fourier analysis and LaPlace transforms . Included are topics such as complex frequency, Z(s), frequency response, resonance, two-port networks, active devices, transformers,   Fourier   series, and complex Fourier series.  A variety of   equipment   will   be used in a laboratory setting to analyze complex electrical circuits and to study active devices.
Prerequisite: ENM 151, ENM 152, and ENT 203.

ENT 210
Computer Aided Drafting/Design II Design
3 Credits
As Needed CC-QR
A continuation of ENT 122. Expands on the AutoCAD LT 2000 variables  and  customization  of  commands  introduced in   ENT 122  Presents  more  complex  commands .
Prerequisite: ENT 122 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 212
Statics
3 Credits
Fall CC-QR
A three-dimensional study of static mechanical force systems including resultants, centroids and centers of gravity, equilibrium, friction, and moments of inertia . Vector algebra is employed.
Co-requisite: ENM 251 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 213
Dynamics
3 Credits Spring CC-CT
A   mathematical   study   of   the   kinematics   and   kinetics.   Topics include  rectangular,  angular,  and  curvilinear motion;  simple harmonic  motion;  instant  centers,  relative  velocity  and  acceleration  and  their  related  quantities; work  and  energy;  impulse  and momentum .  Vector mathematics is used.
Prerequisite: ENT 212 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 214
Strength of Materials
3 Credits
Spring CC-QR
A mathematical study of stresses and deflections of mechanical structures under axial, torsional, and flexural loading. Posts, shafts, beams, columns, and other mechanical shapes are studied, including statically indeterminate cases.
Prerequisite: ENM 152 and ENT 161 or permission of the instructor.
Recommendation: ENT 212.

ENT 225
Introduction to Computer Aided Manufacturing I
4  Credits
3-D  solid  modeling  is  utilized  to  further  investigate   computer aided design (CAD) . The basics of modeling and machining are studied through the introduction of computer aided manufacturing (CAM) and CNC machine tools. Simple parts are designed and created in the lab.
Prerequisite: ENT 152 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 226
Introduction to Computer Aided Manufacturing II
4 Credits
Use of CNC machine tools will be continued.  A  final  project  will be required where students will design and manufacture a project using their knowledge and  experience  with  CAD  and  CAM  from the previous labs . Students will visit local manufacturing facilities to enhance their knowledge of the manufacturing and metal working process.
Prerequisite: ENT 225 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 233
Digital Circuits
4 Credits
As Needed CC-QR
A study of basic networks involved in digital computers. Students with little electronics background should be able to complete this course with some additional study. Course takes up combinational and sequential logic based on Boolean principles. It covers most elements of logic systems in a class and laboratory environment. The course ends with an introduction to the microprocessor.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: MAT 028B or ENM 126 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 234
Microprocessors
3  Credits
As Needed CC-OC
An  introduction  to  the  microprocessor  as  a  process  control  unit, with  study  of  its  general  architecture  and language .  Interfacing with  analog  devices  is  emphasized   In  addition  to  weekly  assignments in the laboratory, this course requires a final project .
Prerequisite:   ENT  233   and   programming   language   experience or   permission   of   the   instructor.

ENT 238
Elements of Machines
4  Credits
As Needed CC-QR
An  introductory  study  of  the  design  and  operating  characteristics of mechanical devices such as  linear  and  rotary bearings;  gears and  gear  systems;  power  transmission  and  synchronous  drive belts; couplings, brakes, and clutches; fluid power pumps; and activators . Applications in high-speed mechanisms   and   precision linear or rotary positioning systems are analyzed. Lab work emphasizes the identification and measurement of dynamic characteristics and performance limits.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: MAT 028B or ENM 126 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 244
Hydraulics and Pneumatics
3  Credits ■ As Needed■ CC-QR
Hydraulic and pneumatic principles, components, and systems . Course includes theory of circuit operation, flow, valving, trans-ducers, system repair and troubleshooting, and safety concerns with hydraulic and pneumatic equipment .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: MAT 028B or ENM 126 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 260
Industrial Control Systems
4  Credits ■ As Needed ■ CC-QR
An introduction to industrial controls and automation that surveys electrical, electronic (digital and analog), and fluid power control systems . The course includes feedback loops, process control, control logic, and transducers . Labs will incorporate program- mable controllers, pneumatic and hydraulic systems, motors and controllers, and robotic manipulators . Semester project required .
Prerequisite:  ENT 129  or  permission  of  the  instructor.

ENT 261
Engineering Physics III: Electricity & Light
4 Credits ■ Fall • SC/ls ■ CC-QR
The third course  in a  series . Lectures  and laboratories cover electrostatics, fields, capacitance, DC circuits, magnetics, electromagnetic waves, light and optics including interference and diffraction  and  related  engineering applications .
Prerequisite: ENT 161 and ENM 152, or permission of the instructor.
Co-requisite: ENM 251 or permission of the instructor.

ENT 275

Independent Study in Engineering Technology I
1-4 Credits
For students with a foundation in the field . Student and instructor determine the project to be worked on and the number of credits to be earned . Laboratory or field work, literature search, and writ- ten or oral reports may be involved . Regularly scheduled meetings between  student  and  instructor  are  required .
Prerequisite: Approval of the department chair or program advisor.

ENT 276
Independent Study in Engineering Technology II
1-4 Credits
For students with a foundation in the field . Student and instructor determine the project to be worked on and the number of credits to be earned . Laboratory or field work, literature search, and writ- ten or oral reports may be involved . Regularly scheduled meetings between  student  and  instructor  are  required .
Prerequisite: Approval of the department chair or program advisor.

ENT 285
Technical Internship in Engineering/Technology I
1-4 Credits
A technical internship in engineering/technology or related field . Learning goals and  documentation  arranged  by contract  with faculty  and  industrial  sponsor .
Prerequisite: Permission of faculty sponsor and assistant dean.

ENT 286
Technical Internship in Engineering/ Technology II
1-4 Credits
A second technical internship  in  engineering/  technology  or related field . Learning goals and documentation  arranged by contract  with  faculty  and  industrial  sponsor .
Prerequisite: Permission of faculty sponsor and assistant dean.


 

Engineering Mathematics

ENM 125
Technical Mathematics I
3 Credits ■ As Needed
A review of arithmetic and an introduction to algebra stressing industrial applications . Designed for students who have previous exposure to the following topics: review of fractions, systems of measurements, number systems, scientific notation, and introduction to algebra .
Skills prerequisite: MAT 018C.

ENM 126
Technical Mathematics II
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ CC-CT ■ CC-QR
A continuation of ENM 125 .  This  applications  based  course includes solutions to algebraic equations, graphing, quadratic equations,  factoring,  and  exponents .
Prerequisite: ENM 125, MAT 028B, or permission of the instructor.

ENM 127
Technical Mathematics III
3 Credits ■ CC-CT ■ CC-QR
A continuation of ENM 125 and ENM 126 . This course is designed to prepare a student for entry into Technical Calculus.Topics  include  trigonometric  functions,  right  triangles,  radians, polar and rectangular forms of vectors, curve sketching, and an introduction  to  analytic  geometry .
Prerequisite: ENM 126 or permission of the instructor.

ENM 151
Engineering Calculus I
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ MA/ma ■ CC-QR
The first  half of  an  introduction to  single-variable  calculus .  Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic, exponential, and inverse  functions,  and  an  introduction to the definite integral . Applications to physics and engineering are emphasized .
Prerequisite: ENM 127, MAT 102 or permission of the instructor.


ENM 152
Engineering Calculus II
4 Credits ■ Spring ■ MA/ma ■ CC-QR
The second half of an introduction to single-variable calculus . Topics  include  the  fundamental  theorem  of  calculus, applications of the  definite  integral  to  physics  and  engineering,  techniques of   integration,   parametric   equations, polar coordinates,   infinite sequences  and  series,  power  series,  and  Taylor  series .
Prerequisite: ENM 151 or permission of the instructor.

ENM 251
Engineering Calculus III
3  Credits ■ Fall ■ MA/ma ■ CC-QR
An extension of the basic concepts of calculus to functions of several variables . Topics include  three-dimensional geometry, vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and line integrals . Applications to physics and engineering are emphasized . 
Prerequisite:  ENM 152.


 

English

ENG 010
Basic Reading
4 Credits
A course designed  to  develop  the  prerequisite  reading  skills needed for entry into ENG 020, Reading  Skills . Classes  cover such fundamentals  as  word  attack  skills,  vocabulary  development, and reading comprehension . College credit  is  awarded  but does not count toward a degree . The class  meets  four  hours  a week . If BCC Learning Skills  Assessment  results  indicate  ENG 010 is required, the student  must  take  the  course  during  the first semester of enrollment . Course completion is by examination with PASS/RE grading .

ENG 020
Reading Skills

4  Credits

A course  in  the  reading  skills  needed  for  better  understanding of written material . Classes emphasize comprehension skills, vocabulary building, and information processing  strategies .  Col- lege credit will be awarded, but this credit will not count toward a degree . If BCC Learning Skills  Assessment  results  indicate  ENG 020 is required, the student  must  take  the  course  during  the first semester of enrollment . Course completion is by examination with PASS/RE grading .
Prerequisite: ENG 010 or skills placement in ENG 020.

ENG 060
Basic Writing
4 Credits
A course designed to prepare students for college-level writing . Emphasis is on the writing process from pre-writing to editing . Reading a college-level work of fiction or non-fiction is  required . Those  students  who  need  intensive  English instruction  for bilinguals  and  non-native  speakers,  as  determined  by  placement scores or faculty review, should complete the ESL course sequence prior to enrolling in this course . The  class  meets  four hours per week . College credit will be awarded but does not count toward a degree . Course completion is by examination with Pass/ RE grading. 
Skills prerequisite: ENG 010.

 

ENG 101
Composition I
3 Credits ■ EC/ec
An introduction to college-level composition . Essay assignments include description,  narration,  and  exposition,  with an  emphasis on exposition . Topics include the writing process, focus, thesis, development  of  a  logical  sequence  of paragraphs,  use  of  supporting examples and specific details, and sentence construction and style . Readings provide models for analysis . This course also provides an introduction to the use of library resources and  to source documentation .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.


ENG 102
Composition II
3 Credits ■ EC/ec ■ CC-CT
A continuation of ENG 101, with emphasis on extending students' reading, writing, and thinking skills .  Essay assignments include exemplification,  analysis,  comparison/contrast,  and  argumentation . Topics include the organization of longer essays, logical development, coherence, appropriate support for points, and style . This course also includes critical reading of essays and continued instruction in research and the responsible use of sources . Prerequisite:  C-  or  better  in  ENG  101.

ENG 103
Honors Composition I
3 Credits • Fall • EC/ec • CC-CT
Extensive exercise in writing in the  various  modes  of  logical discourse as well as in reading with a questioning attitude and discriminating  awareness  of  structure,  language,  and  techniques of expression . This course assumes a competent grounding in the basics  of  composition .
Skills prerequisite: Students must demonstrate competency for ENG 103 on BCC Learning Skills Assessment or have the permission of the instructor. The course is also open to students who have successfully completed ENG 102.

ENG 104
Honors Composition II
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ EC/ec ■ CC-CT
Extensive exercise in writing about the ideas expressed through images, as  in  imaginative  literature .  This  course  offers  practice in  understanding  and  discussing  represented  meanings   in   fiction, poetry and drama . Students will write papers that analyze literature using a variety of approaches (character analysis, comparison/contrast, thematic analysis, and explication, for example) . Enrollment  assumes  a  secure  grasp  of  exposition .

NOTE: Credit is not granted for both ENG 104 and ENG 215. Prerequisite: ENG 103, or permission of the instructor.The course is also open to students who have successfully completed ENG 102.

ENG 116
Report Writing
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ EC/ec
Training and practice in writing reports . This course emphasizes clarity, accuracy, correctness, and methods of presenting and illustrating information .  It  is  intended  to  be  useful  to  students in business, science, technology, or any other area where competence  in  writing  reports  is  needed .
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

ENG 204
Literature of Peace and War
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A study of mankind's quest for peace and resort to war as reflect- ed in literature . Writers to be sampled may include Thucydides, Virgil, Shakespeare, Thoreau, Whitman, Crane, Owen, Remarque, Hemingway, Lowell, Vonnegut, O'Brien and others past and present .
Prerequisite: Six credits of composition or permission of the instructor.

ENG 205
Childrens Literature
3 Credits ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
Designed to provide the student with the theoretical knowledge, history and development of the genre in order to select appropriate literature for children . This course fulfills three credit hours of a literature requirement only for students in the Early Childhood Education and Elementary Education Concentrations .
Prerequisite: Six credits of composition or permission of the instructor.

ENG 215
Introduction to Literature
3 Credits ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A  survey  of  the  short  story,  poetry,  and  drama,  emphasizing   the kinds of questions that help the reader discover the writer's meaning .
NOTE: Credit is not granted for both ENG 104 and ENG  215 .
Prerequisite: Six credits of composition or permission of the instructor.

ENG 216
Introduction to the Novel
3 Credits ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A survey of fiction, emphasizing longer works . Various types  of novels will be examined; other literary forms may be included for comparative  study .
Prerequisite: Six credits of composition or permission of the instructor.

ENG 221
Literature of Western Civilization I
3 Credits • Fall • HU/hu • CC-CT
A sampling  of  landmark  works  of  literature  from  Homeric  Greece to medieval Europe (typically, The Iliad, portions of the  Bible, some Platonic dialogues and  Athenian  tragedies,  The  Aeneid, Inferno) . In  addition to cultural  values of various  eras, the course explores the nature of imaginative literature . It also seeks to improve reading comprehension, and to develop facility in the written expression of ideas . It complements courses in Western civilization and art history .
Prerequisite: Six credits of composition, or permission of the instructor.

ENG 222
Literature of Western Civilization II
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A continuation of ENG 221 which may be elected separately . This course samples landmark works from the Renaissance to the twentieth century as a  way  to  understand  how  literature  reflects the philosophy and concerns of representative cultural eras . Representative writers include Shakespeare,  Milton,  Voltaire, Stendhal, Ibsen, Tolstoy, and Camus . It complements courses in Western civilization and art history .
Prerequisite: Six credits of composition or permission of the instructor.

ENG 223
Creative Writing: Poetry
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
A course in which students create  a  substantial  body  of  work  as they cultivate the unique rhythms of their language and the truths of their imagination . Students work on poems-in-progress  during class  discussion  and  learn  to understand  relationships  between a poem's meaning, sound  and structure . Students develop a  cre- ative process that supports the generation and revision of poems during and after the semester .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060. Recommendation: Six credits of composition.


ENG 228
US Poetry Since 1945
3 Credits ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A course designed to acquaint students with poems written by United States authors since 1945 . Students will study the works of  representative  poets  from  various  movements,  notably  the Beats; confessional poetry; poets of color; and women poets .  
Six  credits  of  composition  or  permission  of  the  instructor. 

ENG 231
American Literature to 1865
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
An examination of essays, poems, stories, and novels of selected authors from the Puritan period to the middle of the nineteenth century . (Nearly all of the noted writers of the period lived in Massachusetts .) The course includes such authors as Bradford, Franklin, Bryant, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Doug- lass, Whitman, and Dickinson .
Six credits of composition or permission of the instructor.

ENG 232
American Literature Since 1865
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A  continuation  of  ENG  231  which  may  be  elected  separately . Novels, stories, poems, and plays from the rise of realism to the present are studied, including works by such authors as James, Twain, Crane, Cather, Frost, Hemingway, and O'Neill .  
Prerequisite:  Six  credits  of  composition  or  permission  of  the instructor.

  ENG 241
British Literature I
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A selective introduction to British writers concentrating on such authors  as  Chaucer,  Shakespeare,  Spenser,  and Milton .   The emphasis is on understanding the way literature expresses moral ideas and values through the imaginative creation of characters .
Prerequisite:  Six  credits  of  composition  or  permission  of  the instructor.

ENG 243
Creative Writing
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
A course for students with a serious interest in creative writing . Assignments will include practice primarily  in  the  short story  but also  in  screenplays,  drama,  poetry,  and/or  creative  nonfiction . Class  discussion  will  center  on  students'  writings  and  the  study of  selected  short  works  of  fiction,  poetry,  and/or  one-act  plays .
Skills  Prerequisite:  ENG  020  and  ENG  060
Recommendation:   Six   credits   of   composition

ENG 245
Modern Fiction
3 Credits ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
Explores in depth, with attention to common themes and stylistic elements, the works of modern fiction writers, such as Chinua Achebe, Raymond Carver, Sandra Cisneros, Ian McEwan, Joyce Carol Oates and Elizabeth Strout .
Prerequisite: Six credits of composition or permission of the instructor.

ENG 260
Introduction to Journalism
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
A survey of the fundamentals of newspaper journalism, emphasizing live reporting, news judgment, and basic news and feature writing . While aimed  at  producing  publishable  journalism,  this course also covers professional areas such as ethics, fairness, reporters'  rights  and  slander .
Prerequisite: Six credits of composition.

ENG 275
Independent Study in English
1-3  Credits
A tutorial course . The student and instructor determine the proj- ect to be undertaken subject to approval by the department chair.
Prerequisite: Six credits of composition and six credits of literature.

ENG 297
Special Topics in Literature
3 Credits • HU/hu
Specific course content at the discretion  of  the  department .  Re- cent topics have included  Women's  Writing, Contemporary  British and American Fiction, Mythology, Gay  and  Lesbian  Literature, Russian Literature, and The Bible. Details are included in pre- registration  materials .
Prerequisite: Six credits of composition or permission of the instructor.


English for Speakers of Other Languages

 

ESL 101
Fundamentals of Beginning English
for Speakers of Other Languages
3  Credits ■ As Needed
Introduction to the English language for non- native speakers including beginning listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills . Topics include present, past, and future tenses; basic sentence structure; skimming and scanning .
Prerequisite: ESL placement or permission of the instructor.

ESL 102
Beginning English forSpeakers of Other Languages II
4  Credits ■ As Needed
A continuation  of  ESL  101;  listening,  speaking,  reading,  and writing skills . Topics include modals, comparison, passive voice, paragraph development, prediction, inference,  and  summarizing . The course includes four hours of class time and two hours of laboratory  each  week .
Prerequisite: ESL 101, ESL placement, or permission of the instructor.

  

ESL 103
Beginning English for
Speakers of Other Languages III
4 Credits ■ As Needed
Advanced beginning level ESL  including  listening,  speaking,  reading, and writing skills . Topics include paraphrasing, vocabulary development, use of an English-English dictionary,  the  writing process,  description,  and narration .  The  course  includes  four hours of class time and two hours  of  language  laboratory  each week .
Prerequisite: ESL 102, ESL placement, or permission of the instructor.

ESL 201
Intermediate English for

Speakers of Other Languages I
4 Credits • As Needed
A survey of the basic structures of English through reading  and writing . This course includes grammar taught and practiced using practical academic applications . The class meets four hours  a week .
Prerequisite: ESL 103, ESL placement, or permission of the instructor.

ESL 202
Advanced English for Speakers of Other Languages
4 Credits • As Needed
A continuation of ESL 201 with further focus on academic writing through vocabulary building  and  grammar  skills development . Topics include the writing process, editing, and summarizing, integrated with activities focusing on reading for understanding, listening,  and  speaking .
Prerequisite: ESL 201, ESL placement, or permission of the instructor.


 

Environmental Science

 

ENV 101
Conservation of Natural Resources I
4 Credits ■ Fall ■ ES/ls
A study of conservation principles and their application to local, regional, national, and  international  resource management .  Topics include water quality, soil  and  wetlands  conservation,  forest and wildlife  management,  alternate  energy  sources,  and  solid waste disposal .  Laboratories  emphasize  hands-on  field  experiences .
Skills prerequisite or co-requisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

ENV 102
Conservation of Natural Resources II
4 Credits ■ Spring ■ ES/ls
A continuation of ENV 101. Topics include air pollution control, biocides and  other  hazardous  substances,  wildlife extinction, world food supply and resource conservation, fisheries management, nuclear energy, environmental laws, and natural resource planning .
Skills prerequisite or co-requisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

ENV 115
Introduction to Nature Photography
3 Credits
A  field-oriented  course  which  explores  both  the  art  and  science of nature photography . With natural lighting and a minimum of special equipment,  students  photograph  wildlife,  landscapes, flowers, and  vegetation .  Specialized applications  will  include aerial and microphotography . A camera is required (contact instructor  for  details) .
Skills prerequisite or co-requisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

ENV 121
Introduction to Environmental Science I
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ ES/ns
A multidisciplinary course dealing with many aspects of the contemporary environment . Presentations from various college departments and by community leaders focus on our role in the environment .

ENV 127
Environmental Awareness and Responsibility
1 Credit ■ ES
Environmental study open to anyone who wishes to develop or deepen an awareness  of  the  environment .  This  course promotes an appreciation of natural beauty and of other natural resources . It  also  provides  exposure  to  ongoing problems  and  solutions .

ENV 133
Everglades  Ecosystems
4 Credits ■ As Needed ■ ES/ls
A field experience focused on the biological diversity of Everglades National Park . This course includes  the  natural history  of  flora and fauna within sawgrass prairie,  tropical  hardwood  hammock, bald cypress head, pineland and coastal mangrove ecosystems . Practical skills in  descriptive  ecology  are  developed  through guided field study .
Skills  prerequisite:  ENG  020  and  ENG  060.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ENV 139
Tropical  Ecosystems
4 Credits ■ ES/ls
A field course in  the  tropical  ecosystems .  This  course  explores the biological diversity of  the New World  tropics and incorporates natural history of flora and fauna within primary and secondary forests, riparian zones,  river  channels, forest  clearings,  and  for- est canopy . Practical skills in biodiversity are developed through guided field study .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ENV 148
Introduction to Sustainable Energy
3  Credits  ■  As  Needed  ■  ES/ns
An  introductory  course  that  surveys  the  energy  sources   upon which human civilization depends and provides an ecological framework for evaluating their sustainability . Topics will include energy conservation, fossil fuels, nuclear power, hydrogen, geothermal, tidal  power  and  the  various  forms  of  solar  energy,  such as solar heating, photovoltaics, wind, hydropower and biomass . Related political policies and economic issues will also be dis- cussed . A few field trips are required .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

ENV 165
Field Methods in Environmental Science
4  Credits  ■  ES/ls
An introduction to field data collection methods . Students will choose, design, and carry-out a field-oriented research project, including final reporting . The course will use GPS/GIS, laptop/ handheld computers, radio-telemetry, seining and live-trapping surveys to  immerse  students  in  all  aspects  involved  in  the  study of wildlife biology .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 060.
Prerequisites: High school biology, BIO 105, or permission of the instructor.

ENV 182
Environmental Advocacy
3  Credits■ As Needed • SS/ss
Designed to provide the student with the knowledge to evaluate and skills to participate in and influence environmental is- sues in the public arena . Operation of local, state, and federal governmental environmental agencies and the role of various stakeholders, such as non-governmental organizations, corporations and citizens will be studied . Participation in public meetings and service learning required .

ENV 207
Wildlife Biology
4  Credits  ■  As  Needed  ■  ES/ls
Ecological, biological, and human  intervention  factors  affecting wildlife populations . This course  emphasizes  the population  ecology and biology of game, non-game, and  endangered  species . Field labs investigate some of these factors by collecting and analyzing  data  about  wildlife  populations .
Prerequisite: ENG 101 and MAT 028A or permission of the instructor.

ENV 208
Aquatic Biology
4 Credits ■ As Needed ■ ES/ls
Biological,  physical,  and  chemical  components  of  freshwater aquatic  habitats  and  their  ecological  relationships . Laboratories involve  observation,  collection,  and  analysis  of  aquatic  samples using  scientific  techniques .
Prerequisite: ENG 101 and MAT 028A or permission of the instructor.


ENV 275
Independent Study in Environmental Sciences I
1-4 Credits
For students with a foundation in the field . Student and instructor determine the project and the number of credits to be earned . Individual or small group projects, especially in the field, may be involved . Regularly scheduled meetings between student and instructor  are  required .
Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair or program advisor.

ENV 276
Independent Study II
1-4 Credits
For students with a  foundation in the  field . Student and  instructor determine the project and the number of credits to be   earned .  Individual  or  small  group  projects,  especially  in  the  field, may  be  involved .  Regularly  scheduled meetings  between  student and  instructor  are  required.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair or program advisor.  

Experiential Learning

 

EXL 225
Experiential Learning I
1-6 Credits
Individually  arranged  learning  by   contract .   This   course   allows the student, with assistance from the faculty sponsor, to define personal learning objectives and  methods  of  evaluation .  The student may contract for independent study, community service internship, field experience, apprenticeship, unpaid  career-related work  experience,  or  other  self-directed  projects .
Prerequisite: Permission of faculty sponsor and assistant dean.

EXL 250
Experiential Learning II
1-6 Credits
Expansion  of  a  previous  project  or  exploration  of  a  new  learning experience .
Prerequisite: Permission of faculty sponsor and assistant dean.

EXL 275
Experiential Learning III
1 Credit
Expansion  of  a  previous  project  or  exploration  of  a  new  learning experience .
Prerequisite: Permission of faculty sponsor and assistant dean.

EXL 290
Experiential Learning IV
1 Credit
Expansion  of  a  previous  project  or  exploration  of  a  new  learning experience .
Prerequisite: Permission of faculty sponsor and assistant dean.

 

Fine Arts

 

FAS 103
Printmaking I
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
An introduction to the art of producing multiple images from a single  source .  This  course  includes  the  preparation  of plates, inking procedures, and the use of the printing press .  
Prerequisite:  FAS  163.

FAS 111
Drawing I
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu
An introduction to the  concepts  and  techniques  of  drawing through the use of charcoal and newsprint . Class problems and critiques are  presented  to  help  the  student  develop  a  foundation of knowledge and ability to build on .

FAS 113
Printmaking II
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
A continuation of FAS 103 . This course includes the study of the skills and processes of printmaking with emphasis on etching and color  printing .
Prerequisite: FAS 103.

FAS 114
Landscape Painting
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU
A study of painting as applied to landscape . The use of color, composition, and overall principals of design will be discussed in relation to painting out-of-doors . Stylistic diversity  will  be  encouraged .

FAS 115
Digital Photography
3 Credits
An introduction  to  photographic  processes  that  use  computer- based technologies . Students learn the  basics  of image  capture with digital cameras and from there explore the world  of  digital image processing, utilizing Adobe Photoshop to  prepare  and modify  images .  The  course  will  examine  digital  photography  as a creative process, focusing on its aesthetic power and use in contemporary  society .

FAS 120
Drawing II
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A continuation of FAS 111 . This course explores drawing as a process of  perception and  coordinated response  with  a continued emphasis on the use of charcoal on newsprint .
Prerequisite: FAS 111.

FAS 123
Two-Dimensional Design I
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A study of the language of visual arts through the analysis of properties of line, form, and the organization of pictorial structure in black, white, and gray . This course includes  the  application  of these discoveries to the resolution of design problems and to the strengthening  of  self-expression .

FAS 124
Three-Dimensional Design I
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
An exploration of the structure and visual qualities of real objects within a spatial environment . Assignments and discussion investigate the relationships of mass, volume, form, and substance;  the nature of materials; and methods of joinery .


FAS 144
Digital Imaging with Photoshop
3 Credits
Covers the digital preparation of visual images for print publication, display, and use with the world wide web . Using Macintosh computers, students will  work  with  Adobe  Photoshop .  Methods for processing and improving the quality of digital images for both screen and print applications will be covered .  Digital  imaging (including  digital  photography) will   be   discussed .   The   course will also cover procedures for retouching,  restoring,  modifying, creating, and rendering images . The preparation of files for a variety of internet and  printing  applications  will  be  covered,  as will methods for working with professional printing companies and newspapers  .
Prerequisite: Macintosh computers/OS or Windows XP experience.

FAS 156
Art and Culture of Asia
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu
A survey of  the  arts  of  India,  China,  and  Japan  and  their  impact on Western  culture .  The  course  includes discussions  of  the  art of painting, sculpture, and architecture,  as  well  as  discussions and comparisons with the alternative arts of Asia which may include ceramics, calligraphy, gardens, martial  arts,  and  haiku . This course  reviews the  arts  with  special  attention  to  the  role of religion and philosophy in their development . Lectures and discussions are illustrated by slides and visual materials; some classes  will  incorporate  participation   and   experimentation   with the particular art . An art background is not required .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

FAS 157
Introduction to Studio Art
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu
A hands-on approach to  studio  art  for  beginning  art  majors  and the non-art student . The creative process will be explored by experimenting with a variety of media . Each medium covered will emphasize mastery of basic techniques and concepts which will strengthen and develop a foundation of knowledge and individuality  of  self-expression .

FAS 163
Two-Dimensional Design II
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A continuation  of  FAS  123, building  on  those  experiences with assignments of increasing complexity in both black and white and color . Color is explored as a means of defining both structure and individual  expression .
Prerequisite: FAS 123.

FAS 171
Pre-Renaissance Art History
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A  descriptive  survey  of  painting,  sculpture,  and   architecture from ancient Egypt through the Gothic period . The religious and mythical character of the arts in ancient societies is emphasized . Lectures and discussions are illustrated by slides  and  visual materials . An art background is not required .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

FAS 172
Renaissance to Modern Art History
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A descriptive survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the fourteenth to the twentieth century . This course includes the development of Western styles with special attention to the role of religion and philosophy . Lectures and discussions are illustrated by slides and visual materials . An art background is not required .
Skills  prerequisite:  ENG  020  and  ENG  060.

FAS 173
Twentieth Century Art History
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A survey of twentieth century art history . Lectures and discussions are  illustrated  by  slides  and  visual  materials .  An art  background is not required .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

FAS 210
Fundamentals of Painting
3  Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A basic introduction to the materials, techniques, and concepts of painting . Class problems and critiques are presented to help the student develop a foundation of knowledge and ability to build on .
Prerequisite:  FAS 163  or  permission  of  the  instructor.

FAS 222
Advanced Studio Art
4  Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
An advanced study in two- or three-dimensional medium or artistic discipline . The student is required to conceptualize a project, plan it, and devote the term to its successful completion . This course functions as a Visual Arts' student's capstone activity .
Prerequisite: FAS 120, FAS 125, FAS 163 and both specialized electives or permission of the instructor.

FAS 225
Figure Drawing
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu
An advanced studio course devoted to drawing the human figure using charcoal and newsprint as the primary medium . Prerequisite:  FAS  120  or  permission  of  the  instructor.

FAS 240
Intermediate Painting
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A continuation of FAS 210 . This course is a further introduction to painting, incorporating the exploration of color, representation, abstraction, and other concepts and axioms of design .
Prerequisite: FAS 210 or permission of the instructor.

FAS 242
Digital Art
3 Credits
An introduction to coloring and manipulating images using Adobe Photoshop, the industry standard for computer and concept art . Students will be introduced to the basic tools and functions of the Photoshop program to create high-impact, professional images in a variety of artistic styles . The course employs a traditional fine- art approach to image coloring and rendering . Experience using a Macintosh or Windows-based computer is necessary .
Prerequisite: FAS 111 or permission of the instructor.

FAS 245
Watercolor Painting
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
A basic introduction to the materials and  techniques  of  water- color painting . Class problems and critiques  are presented  to help students  develop  a  foundation  of  knowledge  and  the  ability to build on this foundation . Students learn dry- and wet-paper techniques; 'resist' practices; and experimental methods . Stylistic diversity  is  encouraged .
Prerequisite: FAS 123 or permission of instructor.


FAS 246
Watercolor Painting II
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
A  continuation  of  FAS  245 .  As  students  continue  to  learn  dry and  wet  paper  techniques,  resist  processes,  and experimental methods,  emphasis  is  placed  on  students  developing  a  fuller understanding of watercolor materials and terminology; a more sophisticated  compositional  sense;  and  the  beginnings  of  a personal aesthetic . Stylistic diversity is encouraged .   
Prerequisite:  FAS  245.

FAS 275
Independent Study in Art
1-3 Credits
For students with a foundation in the field . Student and instructor determine the project and the number of credits to be earned . Projects involve specialized work in art or crafts . Regularly scheduled meetings between student and instructor are required .
Prerequisite:  Permission  of  the  department  chair  or  program advisor.

FAS 297
Special Topics in Visual Arts
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
Specific   course   content   at   the   discretion   of   the   department . Details  are  included  in  preregistration materials. 

  

Fire Science

 

FIS 101
Principles of Emergency Services
3 Credits
An overview  of  fire  protection  and  emergency  services .  This course covers career opportunities in fire protection and  related fields; culture and history  of  emergency  services;  fire  loss  analysis; organization and function of public and private fire protection services; fire departments as part of local government; laws and regulations affecting the  fire service;  basic fire  chemistry and physics; introduction to fire  protection  systems;  introduction  to fire strategy and tactics; life safety initiatives.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.


FIS 106
Fire Behavior and Combustion
3 Credits
An  exploration  of  the  theories  and  fundamentals  of  how  and  why fires  start,  spread,  and  are  controlled.

FIS 123
Building Construction for Fire Protection
3 Credits
Provides  the  components  of  building  construction  related  to firefighter and life safety . The elements of construction and design of structures are shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, pre-planning fire operations and operating at emergencies .
Prerequisite: PHY 111 and FIS 101 or permission of the instructor.

FIS 127
Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply
3 Credits
Provides a foundation of theoretical knowledge in order to understand the  principles  of  the  use  of  water  in  fire protection  and to apply hydraulic principles to analyze and to solve water supply problems.
Prerequisite: MAT 101.

FIS 128
Protection Systems
3  Credits
Provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for  fire protection  and  portable  fire  extinguishers .

FIS 145
Fire Prevention
4  Credits
Provides fundamental knowledge relating to the field of fire prevention . Topics include: history and philosophy of fire prevention; organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau; use and application of codes and standards; plans review; fire inspections; fire and life safety education; and fire investigation .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 060.

FIS 201
Hazardous Materials Chemistry
3 Credits
Provides basic chemistry relating to the categories of hazardous materials   including   recognition,   identification, reactivity   and health hazards encountered by emergency services .  
Prerequisite:   CHM 150.

FIS 205
Legal Aspects of Emergency Services
3 Credits
Addresses the  federal,  state  and  local  laws  that  regulate emergency services . This course includes a review of national standards,  regulations  and  consensus  standards .

FIS 206
Fire Investigation I
3 Credits
Intended to provide the student with the fundamentals and technical knowledge needed for proper fire scene interpretations, including recognizing and conducting origin and cause, preservation of evidence and documentation, scene security, motives of the fire setter and types of fire causes .
Prerequisites: FIS 101, FIS 106 and FIS 123 or permission of the instructor.

FIS 210
Principles of Fire and EmergencyService Administration
3 Credits
An introduction to the organization and management of a fire and emergency services department and the relationship of government agencies to the fire service . Emphasis is placed on fire and emergency service,  ethics,  and  leadership from  the  perspective of the company officer .
Prerequisite: FIS 101 .

FIS 221
Principles of Fire and Emergency Services Safety and Survival
3 Credits As Needed
An introduction to the basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives, focusing on the need for cultural  and  behavior  change  throughout  the  emergency  services .


 

Geography

GEO 125
World Geography
3  Credits  ■  SS/ss
An introduction to World Geography stressing the location and interrelationships of the various nations on  our  planet along  with their cultural, linguistic, economic, and religious makeup . The role of weather and climate, ocean currents, rivers, coastline features, mountains, and geological movement will be examined . Attention will also be given to the geological, topographical, economic, and historical forces that have formed them  and  the  challenges  they face in the 21st century.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.

Geology

 

GEY 121
Earth Systems Science
4  Credits  ■  SC/ls
A systematic, integrated approach to the sciences of geology, oceanography, meteorology, and ecology of planet Earth . The course emphasizes the synergy of interrelated phenomena while focusing on Earth as a system . Students are encouraged to look beyond the traditional boundaries of physical science and learn to recognize the increasingly significant role of humanity as an agent of global change .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

GEY 136
Geographic Information Systems
4 Credits ■ SC/ls
Intended for  science  majors .  This  course  emphasizes  the  role of GIS in scientific investigations, resource management,  and planning . Topics include gathering and organizing geographically referenced information and the representation  of  spatial  information through maps, databases, plans, and images . Students work with a variety of case studies from the fields of environmental science,  natural  resources,  and  public  health .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020, MAT 028A or MAT 028.

GOVERNMENT


 G
OV 105
United States Government

3 Credits  ■ As  Needed  ■ SS/ss
An examination of the American structure of government at the national, state, and local levels . This course examines and explores the powers and limitations of the federal system, the 'checks and balances' system, the machinery of state government, and the variety of municipal and local forms of administration .

 GOV 135
The Constitution and Civil Rights
3 Credits  ■ As  Needed  ■ SS/ss
A study of the Constitution and of major legal interpretations that have reflected social, economic, and  political  changes. Current civil and legal rights of the individual are discussed from the standpoint of an era in  which  the  growing  scope of government has sometimes clashed with the rights of the individual  and sometimes  upheld  and  increased  them .

 GOV 275
Independent Study in Government
1-3 Credits
Tutorials  in  which  student  and  instructor  determine  a  project  and the number of credits to be earned . 
Prerequisite: ENG 101 and permission of the instructor.

 

 

Health Information Mgt.

 

HIM 102
Basic Procedure Coding
3 Credits ■ As Needed
A comprehensive study of Basic HCPCS (Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System) coding with a focus on CPT-4 (Current Procedural Terminology)coding .  Outpatient  and  professional  cod- ing for evaluation and management, anesthesia,  surgery,  pathology, laboratory, radiology and medicine will be emphasized . This course also explores coding  for  emergency  rooms,  physicians' offices, professional services at  inpatient  and  outpatient  facilities and HCPCS  II  codes .
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020, ENG 060 and MAT 018 or MAT 018C.
Prerequisites: AHS 129

HIM 105
Medical Coding I

3 Credits ■ As Needed
A comprehensive study of ICD-10-CM (International Classification of Diseases, Version 10, Clinical Modification) and PCS (Procedure Coding System) . The course will involve an in-depth study of coding diseases for all major body systems . A systematic study of hospital inpatient and ambulatory care coding will also be cov- ered . Specificity and correct coding procedures and techniques will be stressed . The course will include coding practices for both ICD-10-CM diagnosis and ICD-10-PCS procedure coding . This course along with the subsequent Medical Coding II course will help prepare the student for completion of the AHIMA (American Health Information Management Association) CCS (Certified Coding Specialist) credentialing examination .
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020, ENG 060 and MAT 018 or MAT 018C.
Prerequisites: High school biology or BIO 101 or BIO 105 and AHS 129.

HIM 106
Medical Coding II
3 Credits
A continuation of HIM 105 . This course along with the preceding Medical Coding I course will help prepare the student for completion of the AHIMA (American Health Information Management Association) CCS (Certified Coding Specialist)  credentialing examination .
Prerequisites: HIM 105 with a grade of C or better. Co- requisite: BIO 150.

HIM 132
Reimbursement Methodologies
3 Credits ■ As Needed
A comprehensive overview of billing for  facility  services  using ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification), CPT (Current Procedural Terminology) and HCPCS   (Healthcare   Common   Procedure   Coding   System)codes to complete UB-04(uniform institutional provider hardcopy) claim forms .  The course will  familiarize the student  with health records and how documentation translates  to  the  basics  of  medical coding, billing, insurance and proper reimbursement . The course also discusses the various reimbursement methodologies affecting facilities and provides an introduction to  coding  classification systems and the payer and healthcare system in the U .S .
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020, ENG 060 and MAT 018 or MAT 018C.
Prerequisites: HIM 106 or permission of the instructor.


HIM 144
Introduction to Health Information Management
3 Credits ■ As Needed
An introduction to healthcare delivery  systems,  health  information management, the patient record in acute, outpatient and alternate care settings, numbering  and  filing  systems,  record storage and circulation, indexes, registers, health data  collection, legal  aspects  and  reimbursement .
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020, ENG 060 and MAT 018 or MAT 018C.

 

History

 

HIS 113
Western Civilization to 1500
3 Credits ■ HI/ss
An exploration of the origins and development of Western society and culture from prehistory through the Ancient Near East, Greece, Rome, and the Middle Ages to the Renaissance.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

HIS 114
Western Civilization Since 1500
3 Credits ■ HI/ss
An examination of the political, social, and cultural history of Western civilization from the Renaissance to the present, with emphasis on the causes and consequences of the West's rise to worldwide influence and on the roots of current global issues.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

HIS 117
United States History to 1877
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ HI/ss
A survey of the social and political development of North America, the British Colonies, and the United States from before the arrival of Europeans to the Civil War and Reconstruction .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

HIS 118
United States History Since 1865
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ HI/ss
A  survey  of  the  social  and  political  development  of  the  United States from the Civil War to the present .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

HIS 121
World History to 1500
3 Credits ■ All Terms ■ HI/ss
An exploration of the origins of humankind and the development of ancient and Medieval societies across the world (India, China, Africa, the Americas, Australia, Europe and the Middle East) .
Skills  prerequisites:  ENG  020  and  ENG  060.

HIS 122
World History Since 1500
3 Credits ■ All Terms ■ HI/ss
An exploration of the increasingly interconnected  modern  world from the period of European colonialism after Columbus to the emergence of globalization after World War II .
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

HIS 208
Introduction to Chinese Civilization
3 Credits  ■ As  Needed  ■ SS/ss
An investigation of the cultural development and 4,000-year-old traditions of China,  and  China's  influence  on  the  Far East  and on the world . Western civilization is compared and contrasted to Chinese values .  Beginning  with  prehistory, the  major  elements of Chinese thought and behavior patterns are analyzed, and the insights gained from  the  study  of Chinese  history  are  applied  to an  understanding  of  contemporary  China .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

HIS 225
Comparative Religions
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu   CC-CT
An examination of the major religious systems of the world, with attention to their interactions and their common threads . This course covers Christianity in its variants, Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism and Taoism, Islam, Judaism, and the belief systems of Africa, North American  Indians,  and  the  Greek  and  Norse religions .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

HIS 232
The World Since 1945
3 Credits ■ SS/ss ■ CC-CT
An overview of global history from World War II to the present . Emphasis will be given to the Cold War, international conflict and cooperation, globalization and the  emergence  of  new  issues  in the  21st  century .
Prerequisites: ENG 020 and ENG 060 Prerequisite: HIS 122 is recommended.

HIS 236
History and Culture of Japan
3 Credits  ■ As  Needed  ■ SS/ss
A  survey  of  the  history  and  culture  of  Japan,  using  the  events  of history  and  elements  of  culture .  This  course  is designed  to  lead the  student  into  greater  understanding  of  contemporary  Japan and  the  Japanese .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060. Recommendation: Six credits of composition.

HIS 238
History of the Holocaust
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ SS/ss   CC-CT
A history of the  holocaust  in  Europe,  exploring  the  emergence  of the Nazi power structure and the implementation of a policy of extermination of Jews and others defined as undesirable by the German state . Our study will include a review of other genocidal programs from the Armenian  to  current  historical  tragedies .  We will explore the historical legacy of the  holocaust  and  its  impact upon  society  today .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

HIS 275
Independent Study in History
1-3 Credits
Tutorials  in  which  student  and  instructor  determine  a  project  and the number of credits to be earned .
Prerequisite: One previous course in history and the permission of the instructor.

HIS 297
Special Topics in History
3 Credits
Specific  course  content  at  discretion  of  the department .  Details are  included  in  preregistration  materials .

 

 

HonorS

  

HON 298

Honors  Colloquium
3-4 Credits
Issues-oriented seminar coordinating  several disciplines  in a combined effort to address  human  and  social  concern. A  different theme or integrating concept may be  chosen  for  the  seminar each year . Recommended for students  with high  interest  levels and  well-developed  reading  and  writing  skills.
Prerequisite: Membership in the Berkshire Honors Scholar Program.

 

HON 298B
Honors  Colloquium:
Sustainable Ecotourism in Berkshire County
3 Credits ■ ES
An interdisciplinary honors colloquium that focuses on the development of a plan for sustainable ecotourism in the  Berkshire region . Students will work in small  groups  to  gather  and  analyze data for a preliminary plan to be submitted at the end of the semester . Topics will include the natural, historic,  scenic,  and economic resources/potential of the region within the context of sustainability . Analysis of the  current  array  of  Berkshire  ecotourism enterprises will set the stage to identify future ecotourism possibilities . Students will also investigate the role Berkshire's natural resources  play in  advertising .  A high level  of participation and initiative is expected from each student . Course format  in- cludes classroom seminars, report critiques, and off-campus field experience (i .e .,, a weekend trip to Cape Cod) . Some readings are required before  the  course  begins,  and  students  may  be  required to  attend  a  regional  conference on ecotourism .
Prerequisites: ENG 101, and membership in the Berkshire Honors Scholar Program.

 

HON 298C
Honors Colloquium: 17th Century - the Emergence of the Modern World
3  Credits  ■  HU/hu
Intended to familiarize students with issues that characterize the Seventeenth Century . This course will explore tensions between science and religion, Old World and New World,  and  some  of  its major figures . Rather than focus  solely  on Europe,  our  investigation is global and extends to civilizations from Africa and Asia as well as the  New Worlds  of North  and South America .  In addition to readings, works of music and art that illuminate the themes of the 17th Century may also be studied .
Prerequisite: ENG 101 and membership in the Berkshire Honors Scholar Program.


HON 298E
Honors Colloquium: Philosophy of the Life Sciences
4  Credits  ■  HU/hu
An exploration  of  the  life  sciences,  past  and  present .  Designed to put life sciences into philosophical, historical, and ethical perspective,   the   colloquium   focuses   on   key   problems    and their treatment  through  history  (e .g .  origin  of  life,  classification of   organisms,   energy   conservation),   processes    of    discovery and reasoning (e .g . evidence vs . revelation, eureka-moments, serendipity, logical reasoning, scientific research, cloning) . The colloquium also examines vogue ideas (e .g . biodiversity, esprit de systeme, hopeful monsters, survival of the fittest, human 'races', biofeedback)  as  well  as   biological   misconceptions,   deceptions, and hoaxes (e .g . preformation, phrenology, creative Darwinism, Piltdown  man,  intelligent  design) .
Prerequisite: Membership in the Berkshire Honors Scholar Program.

HON 298F
Honors  Colloquium:
Conspiracy Theories In American History
3 Credits ■ SS/ss
An investigation into the roles that conspiracy theories play in American society  and  culture,  and  the  place  of  these  theories in the broader context of American history . The colloquium will examine competing explanations for the prevalence of conspiracy theories, and will explore well documented conspiracies (e .g ., Watergate; Iran-Contra), as well as classic 'conspiracy theories' which have not been substantiated (e .g ., the Kennedy assassination;  the  9-11  'Truth Movement') .
Prerequisite: Membership in the Honors Program.

HON 298G
Honors  Colloquium:
Gothic Literature and Horror Film
3 Credits As Needed ■ HU/hu
An exploration of the Gothic novel from its origins to the current cultural movement, and its evolution into horror film . The course will examine how 'classic' Gothic devices and conventions were employed by such authors as Shelley, Poe, Stevenson, Stoker, and King, and how those conventions developed in film throughout the  twentieth  century .  This  colloquium  will  include  literary, historical, psychological and sociological approaches to 'horror". 
Skills  prerequisite:  ENG  020  and  ENG  060 .
Prerequisite: Membership in the Honors Program.
Recommendation: Six credits of composition.

HON 298H
Honors Colloquium: Disease and Disability/A Historic and Holistic View
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ SS
An overview of the  complex  effects  of  disease  and  disability  on the individual . This course will examine the effects of disability and disease on  the  person  and  consider  historic  perceptions  related to these terms . Facilitated discussions will  focus  on  how  those with limited 'ability' are perceived within different cultures . Case studies, essays and movies will be used to stimulate interactions related to the psychosocial effects  commonly  perceived  by persons with physical, cognitive and  psychological  impairments . This course requires students to view material in multiple manners including  essays,  novels,  movies,  and  websites .
Prerequisite: ENG 101 and membership in the Berkshire Honors Scholar Program.

HON 298I
Honors Colloquium: Graphic Novel and Comics as Cultural Barometer
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT ■ CC-WC
An introduction to critical methods in popular culture studies, with a  focus  on  the  graphic  novel  and  comics  as cultural producer and process . Through a survey of primary texts, we will learn how graphic storytellers use historical and contemporary social issues as a primary source for their work . The translation of traditional literary pieces into graphic medium will also be addressed .
Prerequisites:  Membership  in  the  Berkshire  Honors  Scholar Program.  Six  credits  of  composition  or permission of the instructor.


 

Hospitality

HSP 101

Introduction to Hospitality
3 Credits ■ CC-CT ■ CC-WC
An exploration of the  fascinating  worlds  and  careers  available  in the hospitality industry . This course identifies opportunities and careers available in lodging, food service, meeting planning,  and travel and tourism . The educational and professional objectives of these careers will be explored .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.

HSP 105
Hospitality Law

3 Credits
An introduction to legal issues of the hospitality industry . This course covers  rights  and  liabilities  of  the  travel  agent and airlines as well as legal fundamentals for  the  food  service  and hotel industry as it  pertains to guest relationships .  Topics include contract law, negligence, guests' rights, and  employment  and licensing  issues .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.

HSP 108
Wine Appreciation

1  Credit
A study of the understanding and appreciation of  wines .  Stu- dents  learn  to  recognize  wines   of   different   varieties, sources, and  quality;   and  study   wine  purchasing,   storage,  and   service . A  five-week  course .

HSP 109
Beverage Management

2  Credits
An examination of the controls and  management  principles involved in operating a cocktail lounge . This course includes the procedures for controlling beverage costs  and  serving  drinks,  as well as purchasing, storing, and inventory of beers and liquors . A ten-week  course .

HSP 112
Applied Food Service Sanitation
2  Credits ■ Fall ■ HF
A  study   of   food   service   production   areas   from   a   sanitation perspective .   This   course   emphasizes   facts and  principles   of sanitation and  safety  in  the  preparation,  handling,  and  service of food . Students prepare for and take  the  SERVSAFE  Food Protection  Certification  examination .

HSP 115
Food Service Management

3  Credits  ■  CC-QR
An introduction to the procedures and forms used to control costs in a food service operation . This course  emphasizes  controlling costs of labor, food, and beverages, and the importance of  this control to a successful operation . Other topics discussed are the issuing, purchasing, receiving, and storing of foods  and  beverages .
Prerequisite: BUS 105 or permission of the instructor.

HSP 117
Hotel Management

3 Credits ■ Fall
An introduction to the principles and procedures of hotel management, including each department within the hotel . This course covers housekeeping, maintenance, and sales, with special emphasis on front desk operations .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.

HSP 118
Dining Room Management
3 Credits
A study of the responsibilities  of  the  dining  room  manager, including choice of  equipment,  menu  planning,  styles  of food service  (such  as  American,  French,  or  Russian)  and  the  situations in which each should be used; pleasing customers; day-to-day operations;  and  assuming  responsibility .

HSP 125
Hospitality Management
3 Credits
An introduction to the broad and dynamic world of hospitality management . This  course  explores  management principles  used to successfully operate hotels, restaurants,  and  travel  and  tour- ism organizations . Issues are explored from a supervisory and/or middle management perspective with emphasis on  the  applications  of  principles  of  management .

HSP 133
Introduction to Spa Management
3  Credits ■ As Needed
A study of the responsibilities of the spa director for a resort hotel property .  The  course  provides  a  contemporary look at  the  spa industry  and  the  various  and  unique  aspects  of  spa  operations from day spa to resort spas .
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020 and MAT 018C


HSP 218
Lodging Revenue Management
3 Credits ■ As Needed
An exploration of current strategies to maximize revenue in various business settings with emphasis on the hotel and lodging industry . Topics to explore include yield management, effective pricing techniques, market segmentation, distribution channels, overbooking practices and forecasting.
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020 and MAT 018C.

HSP 237
Hospitality Seminar
3 Credits
Research and discussion of current trends and issues  in  the hospitality industry . This course includes guest speakers who are professionals within their field and student research on selected hospitality topics . Field trips are required . Subscriptions to professional  journals  are  required .

HSP 285
Cooperative Education I
1-3 Credits
A practical work experience for the  Hospitality/Culinary  Arts students .  The  objectives  and  theory  covered  in  the classroom will be integrated  within  the  work  experience  setting  and will be supervised by a work site coordinator .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and MAT 018C

HSP 286
Cooperative Education II
1-3 Credits
A continuation of skill development and review  of  work  experience for Hospitality/Culinary Arts students . Objectives and theory covered in the classroom will be integrated within the work experience  and  supervised  by  a  work-site coordinator .


 

Human Services

HSV 111

Human Service Methods
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ CC-CT
An examination of roles, skills, methods, and psychological and ethical concepts involved in effective helping . Students study observation, listening, intake, referral, assessment, and problem- solving skills .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.

HSV 135
Intro to Community Resources

3 Credits ■ Fall
A broad survey of local resources and social services . Through readings, guest lectures, and research, students use Berkshire County as a social laboratory to examine community governance, health services, education, social welfare programs, public and voluntary personal social services, and formal and informal groups . The course also examines the impact of the economy and natural resources on the community .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 010. Skills co-requisite: ENG 020.

HSV 151
Field Work Seminar I

1  Credit
A discussion course for human services interns to share field work experiences through case presentations . Students explore organizational structure; agency goals; human service roles; helping philosophies; supervisory, client, and colleague relationships; and professional ethics . Techniques and  skills  for  specific  internships are  discussed .
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Co-requisite: HSV 161.

HSV 161
Field Practicum I

2  Credits
An introductory internship giving students firsthand experience observing  human  service  agencies  in  operation .  Students   perform  tasks  appropriate  to  a  novice  intern  and  record  experiences in field work journals . An  agency  staff  member  provides  supervision . Students spend a minimum of eight hours a week in the internship  agency .
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Co-requisite: HSV 151.

HSV 197
Topical Seminar in Human Services
1-4 Credits
Specific   course   content   at   the   discretion   of   the   department . Details  provided  in  preregistration  materials Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or program advisor.

HSV 244
Working with Elders

3 Credits ■ CC-OC ■ CC-WC
A course preparing human services students  and  professionals  to work with elders in the community . The course will utilize universal design (UDL) techniques in the delivery of content as well as in providing students with UDL  techniques that  assist  in  addressing the  issues  and  challenges  of  the  elder  population .
Prerequisite: HSV 111 or 135 with a grade of B or better or permission of the instructor.

HSV 252
Field Work Seminar II

1 Credit
A continuation of skill development and sharing field experiences through case presentations . Students discuss  factors which  affect helping relationships, and the  effectiveness  of  assessment and  intervention  techniques  used  in  each case .
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Co-requisite: HSV 262.

HSV 253
Field Work Seminar III
1 Credit
A continuation of skills development and  review  of  field  experience through case presentations . The course emphasizes the dynamics of  helping  relationships,  considers  individual  professional issues affecting ethics and competence, and develops assessment  and  intervention  skills .
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Co-requisite: HSV 263.

HSV 262
Field Practicum II
3 Credits
An internship with increased levels of direct involvement in helping relationships, agency functioning, assessment, and case planning . Students keep field work journals and spend a minimum of twelve hours a week in the internship supervised by an agency staff person .
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Co-requisite: HSV 252.

 

HSV 263

Field Practicum III
3 Credits
An internship which emphasizes the student's ability to demonstrate the skills and ethical standards of an entry-level human services professional . Students deal with more complex  and intensive  agency   operations,   assessment,   intervention,  and case planning .  Students  spend  at  least  twelve  hours  a  week in the agency and write case reports which demonstrate case management skills and the ability to record objective behavioral descriptions .
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Co-requisite: HSV 253.

HSV 280
Group and Professional Development
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ CC-CT
A capstone  course  synthesizing  Human  Services  program concepts and experiences . The dynamics of groups are taught through readings, discussions, exercises, and  games .  Students explore group development, leadership styles, and group responsibilities for a better understanding of self, client, and professional roles .
Prerequisite: HSV 252 and HSV 262 with a grade of B or better or permission of the instructor.

HSV 297
Topical Seminar in Human Services
1-3 Credits ■ As Needed
Specific course  content  at  the  discretion  of  the  department . Details are in preregistration materials . Prerequisite: PSY 107 and permission  of  the  instructor  or  program  advisor .


 

Humanities

HUM 121

Introduction to the Humanities
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu ■ CC-WC
An interdisciplinary introduction to the world of ideas and the creative  process .  Films,  slides,  music,  readings,  and guest  lectures give  students  an  insight  into  explorations  of  the  creative  mind through  the  arts--literary,  dramatic,  musical,  and  visual .
Prerequisite:  ENG  101.

HUM 136
Conversational American Sign Language

3 Credits ■ HU/hu
Introduction to various forms of sign language and Deaf  Culture . Topics include fundamental sign vocabulary, syntax, and  grammar, as well as history of Deaf Culture and  legal,  ethical,  educational, and  cultural  issues  facing  the  Deaf .

HUM 148
Turbulent Decade: Changing America in the 1960's

3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu
An investigation of the  people,  politics,  and  prose  of  a  critical era in American history . This course includes a study of  the  Civil Rights Movement, the  New Feminism, and  the war in  Vietnam as well as the art, music, and literature of the period . In addition to books, films  and  other  media  are  used  to  bring  home  the  reality of the era .
Prerequisite: ENG 101 or permission of the instructor.

HUM 155
The Harlem Renaissance

3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu ■ CC-WC
An exploration of Harlem as the 1920s capital of  the  'black world' where poets, novelists, sculptors, painters, and musicians congregated . This course examines questions  such  as:  Who  was this 'New Negro?' What effect did white patronage  have  on  the black artist? Through lecture, discussion, and film  the  course examines the  works  and  careers  of  prominent  black  artists  such as  Langston  Hughes,  Countee  Cullen,  Jessie  Fauset,  and  Zora Neale Hurston .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

HUM 159
Digital Culture
3  Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A survey course of the pervasive impact of technology on contemporary life and institutions . Topics include a history of technology; social media and mobile technology's role in the 'my' culture; security and privacy on the Internet; career technologies; search, search engines, information, and 'big data'; gaming; the sharing economy; technology and gender; and other topics . Course assessments include blogging, quizzes and exercises .
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020 and ENG 060. Word processing, email and Moodle skills recommended.

HUM 168
Travel and Study: International Culture 
History and Nature

3 Credits ■ HU/hu
An interdisciplinary travel study course to explore international culture,  history,  and  nature  through  on-campus sessions and travel abroad, site visits, readings,  discussions,  and  research projects .  Trips may  include  service learning  components or  home stays  in  the  destination  country .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 010.  Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

HUM 297
Special Topics in Humanities
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
Specific  course   content   at   the   discretion   of   the   department . Details  are  in  preregistration  materials .
Prerequisite: ENG 101 or permission of the instructor.

 

 

Interdisciplinary

 

INT 103
College Identity in Context
3 Credits ■ Fall and Spring
Designed to promote  student  immersion  and  success  in  the college experience through an interdisciplinary examination  of  is- sues of social and personal  relevance .  Assignments,  group  work, and discussions will focus on areas as diverse as art, history, literature, psychology, and science while engendering knowledge, skills,  and  behaviors necessary  for  college  success .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 010.


Massage Therapy

MBW 110
T
herapeutic Massage I
5 Credits ■ Fall ■ HF
Concentration  on  Swedish  Massage;  safe  massage  practices; body mechanics; and physiological effects  of massage  taught through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on lab experience . Basic medical terminology will be introduced . There will  be  three hours of lecture and nine hours of supervised hands-on practical experience per week . Prerequisite: Admission  to  the  Massage Therapy  program.
Co-requisite: AHS 131 and BIO 150.

MBW 120
Therapeutic Massage II
4 Credits ■ Spring
Appropriate applications as well as indications  and  contraindications for various massage techniques will be discussed. Other topics will include documentation and  current  laws .  There  will  be two hours of lecture  and six hours of  supervised hands-on practical lab experience per week.
Prerequisite: AHS 131, BIO 150 and MBW 110.
Co-requisite: AHS 162, AHS 230, MBW 130, MBW 131 and MBW 150.

MBW 130
Therapeutic Massage Practicum
2 Credits ■ Spring ■ CC-CT
Students will be required to complete a 100 hour supervised clinical practicum, in addition to two hours per week of practical laboratory  integration .  Emphasis  is  on  gaining  clinical  experience, and developing professional and technical skills within a supervised environment .
Prerequisite: Current first aid and CPR certification, proof of current immunizations, medical  records  and CORI clearance,  AHS  131,  BIO  150  and  MBW  110.
Co-requisite: AHS 162, AHS 230, MBW 120, MBW 131 and MBW 150.

MBW 131
Therapeutic Massage Seminar
1 Credit ■ CC-WC ■ CC-OC
An introductory study of massage and bodywork research .  Students will explore the significance of research, the basic research process and various  research  approaches .  Emphasis  will  be placed  on  how  research  can  be  critically read  and  integrated into  massage  practice  to  enhance  professional  knowledge  and technical  skills .

Prerequisite: ENG 101 or permission of the instructor.  
Co-requisite: MBW 120 and MBW 130.

MBW 150
Business Practice for Massage Therapy
1 Credit ■ Spring ■ CC-QR
An overview of the business aspects of massage therapy . Areas covered include methods of income, business planning, business development, management, marketing and establishment of a business  plan .
Prerequisite: MBW 110 or permission of the instructor.
Co-requisite: MBW 120, MBW 130 and MBW 131.

  

Mathematics

 

BCC’s mission is to prepare students for graduation, transfer and careers; the Math Department’s mission is to help students gain quantitative literacy, understand mathematical ideas, and use them to excel in their future work . We support degree programs of study, and students will find that the rigor and demands of the courses offered here are aligned with many four-year colleges and universities . The Math Department acknowledges the recommen- dations of professional mathematical societies such as AMATYC and NCTM  .

BCC math courses range from arithmetic through calculus  and many are offered in two formats: the traditional teacher-paced lecture  format  and  the  self-paced  MAT  800  format . 

In the MAT 800 series, students advance at their own rates and credits are earned individually . Self-motivated students can move quickly through their math credits, while those students who have not recently had math courses or who are lacking in confidence can move more slowly with the individualized faculty assistance needed to build solid foundations for long term success .

There are no lectures in this setting . Instead, students work with their texts, computers, teachers, and tutors, if desired, to learn the material . They decide when to take tests, and then are al- lowed to retest until they pass . Students may select MAT 800 for one or two credits, and then may choose to add more once these are completed . Each student works with his or her teacher to plan the pace at which the credits should be completed .


■    Pre-College-Level Math

Many students who take the  Learning  Skills  Assessment  place into Basic Math or Introductory Algebra . Our mission, as pre- college-level  math  teachers,  is  to  help  each  student   master skills,  learn  techniques,  and  gain  confidence  in  order  to  build a solid foundation for college-level math .  Pre-college-level courses may be teacher-paced (MAT  018,  MAT  028,  MAT  029, MAT 045), on the self-paced MAT 800 “modules” (MAT 011 through MAT 029C) . Course credits at this level do not transfer . At the pre-college-level major tests will be  aligned  in  content, rigor,  and  convenient  for  lecture  and  MAT  800  students . 

■    College-Level Math

Although specific programs may require more or less math, College Algebra, Elementary Statistics, and Survey of College Mathematics fulfill the BCC general education graduation re- quirement . Of these three, College Algebra is the most widely transferable  and  prepares  students  for  pre-calculus . 

It is available in the traditional teacher-paced format as well as the self-paced MAT 800 format . The Math Department offers courses that meet the requirements at institutions where the majority of BCC students expect to transfer . Degree  and  pro- gram requirements vary  among  institutions;  the  responsibility for a realistic plan belongs to each student .

 

Teacher-Paced  Courses:
MAT 018
Pre-algebra
3 Credits
A comprehensive refresher in basic mathematics . Topics include fractions, decimals, ratio and proportion, percents, geometry and measurement . College credit will  be  awarded,  but  this  credit  will not count toward a degree .
Skills prerequisite: MAT 011. Skills co-requisite: ENG 010.

MAT 028
Elementary Algebra I-III
3 Credits
The first semester of a two-semester sequence in elementary algebra . Topics include solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing linear equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and an  introduction  to polynomials College  credit  will be awarded, but this credit will not count toward a degree .
Skills prerequisite: MAT 018C. Skills co-requisite: ENG 020 and/or ENG 060.


MAT 029
Elementary Algebra IV-VI
3  Credits
The second semester of a two-semester  sequence  in  elementary algebra preparing students for intermediate algebra. Topics include factoring polynomials, operating with rational expressions, solving rational expressions, solving rational equations, manipulating square roots and solving square root and quadratic equations . College credit will be awarded, but this credit will not count toward a degree .
Skills prerequisite: MAT 028C or MAT 028 or by learning skills placement.
Skills co-requisite: ENG 020 and/or ENG 060.

MAT 045
Introduction to Mathematical Literacy
4  Credits
A one semester course for students majoring in programs that do not require college algebra or higher level mathematics . Topics include basic numeracy, data analysis, proportional reasoning, algebraic reasoning, and an introduction to linear and exponential functions . Emphasis is on developing students' abilities to interpret and analyze data, to problem solve using algebraic and graphical representations,   and   to   effectively   communicate   mathematics in writing . This course is  a  prerequisite  for  Statistics  (MAT  123) and Survey of College Math (MAT 113)only . College credit will be awarded, but this credit will not count toward a degree. 
Skills prerequisite: MAT 018 or MAT 018C. Skills co-requisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

MAT 101
Applied Contemporary Mathematics
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ CC-QR
An examination of a  variety  of  mathematical  concepts  which  focus on solving problems, interpreting data, and applications . This course includes topics such as tables, graphs, basic statistics, geometric measures,  and  consumer mathematics .  This  course fulfills the BCC mathematics requirement ONLY for the Business Software Systems, Criminal Justice, Fire Science,  and  Human Services  programs.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and MAT 018C.

MAT 102
College Algebra
3 Credits ■ MA/ma ■ CC-QR
A comprehensive course in  college  algebra .  Topics  include,  but are not limited to, systems of linear equations, rational exponents, radical  equations,  complex  numbers,  and  the  conic  sections .  This course  introduces  the concept  of  a  function,  and  includes  the study  of  linear,  quadratic,  logarithmic,  and  exponential  functions and equations .  Applications  are  emphasized.

Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and MAT 029C or MAT 029.

 

MAT 113
Survey of College Mathematics
3  Credits ■ All Terms ■ MA/ma ■ CC-QR
A selective study of mathematical concepts for liberal arts students . Concepts include: number sense and numeration, geometry and measurement, patterns and functions, and data analysis . Topics covered include: sets, logic, graphs of quadratic and exponential functions, systems of linear equations and inequalities and symmetry . Emphasis is on the use of algebra in applications for the liberal arts and sciences.
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020 and MAT 029, 029C or 045.

MAT 121
Precalculus
4  Credits ■ Fall ■ MA/ma ■ CC-QR
A one semester course  designed  for  students  who  will  study calculus . Topics include functions, transformations, inverses, and families of functions including polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic  and  trigonometric . Trigonometric  identities  and  the conic sections  are  also  covered .  This  course  emphasizes  graphs of functions and problem solving using trigonometry, analytic geometry  and  advanced  algebra .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.
Prerequisite: MAT 102 or MAT 102C or by learning skills assessment  placement.

MAT 123
Elementary Statistics
3 Credits ■ MA/ma ■ CC-QR
A first  course  in  statistics  designed  to  introduce  concepts  such as the  normal  distribution,  statistical  inference,  'Z' and  'T'  tests, as well as linear regression and correlation . Topics include  prob- ability, contingency tables, and analysis of  variance .  Applications from the real world and in various fields of study, as well as cur- rent  technological  tools,  are emphasized.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.
Prerequisite: MAT 029, MAT 029C, MAT 136 or MAT 045.


MAT 136
Mathematics for the Health Sciences
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ CC-QR
A selective study of  mathematical  concepts  for  students  entering the  health  sciences .  Topics  include  direct  and inverse  proportions, conversions, applications of linear  functions  and  their models, applications of exponential and logarithmic functions and their models, basic geometry and trigonometry, introduction to probability and statistics .  This course  fulfills  the  BCC  mathematics requirements ONLY for students entering the health sciences programs .
Skills prerequisite: MAT 028B or MAT 051 and ENG 020 and/ or ENG 060.

 

MAT 145
Applied Calculus I
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ MA/ma ■ CC-QR
A study of differential calculus, including such topics as functions, limits and continuity, the derivative, techniques of differentiation, maximum-minimum problems, curve sketching, and exponential growth and decay . Emphasis is on applications to business, economics,  and  the  social  sciences .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.
Prerequisite: MAT 121C or MAT 121.

MAT 146
Applied Calculus II
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ MA/ma ■ CC-QR
A continuation of MAT 145 . This course is a study of integral calculus, including such topics as the anti-derivative, the definite integral, techniques of integration, improper integrals, partial derivatives, least squares technique, LaGrange multipliers, differential equations, and Taylor series . Emphasis is on applications to  business,  economics,  and  the social  sciences.
Prerequisite: MAT 145.

MAT 151
Calculus I
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ MA/ma
A  complete  and  comprehensive  course  in  calculus .  Applications in the physical and  natural  sciences  are emphasized  as  well  as the underlying theory and the logical development of the material . Topics include limits, continuity, derivative rules, maximum-  mini- mum concavity, separable differential equations, area, and the fundamental theorem.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020. Prerequisite: MAT 122C or MAT 122.


MAT 152
Calculus II
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ MA/ma
A continuation of MAT 151 . Topics include volumes, arc length, surface of revolution, force, work and energy, growth and decay, inhibited  population  growth,  trigonometric  and  hyperbolic  functions, integration techniques, numerical integration, centroids, L'Hopital's  Rule,  and  improper  integration.
Prerequisite: MAT 151.

MAT 253
Linear Algebra
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ MA/ma ■ CC-QR
Systems,  matrix  algebra,  inevitability,  determinant  function, adjoint, dot product, cross product, basis,  dimension, Gram- Schmidt process, Kernel, range, similarity, eigenvectors, diagonalization,  and  applications.
Prerequisite: ENM 152.

MAT 254
Differential Equations
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ MA/ma ■ CC-QR
A study of the solutions to  differential  equations .  Topics  include first, second, and higher order, mostly linear equations; also nonhomogeneous  and  non-linear  equations  with   initial   values and boundary conditions . Laplace transforms, linear first order systems,  and  power  series  solutions  are  included .
Prerequisite: ENM 152 and MAT 253 or permission of the instructor.

MAT 275
Independent Study in Mathematics I
1-3 Credits
Tutorials in which student and  instructor  determine  the  project and the number of credits to be earned subject to approval by the department  chair .

MAT 276
Independent Study in Mathematics II
1-3 Credits
Tutorials in which student and  instructor  determine  the  project and the number of credits to be earned subject to approval by the department  chair .


 

Mathematic Modules

 

 The following MAT 800 Modules equal 1 credit

 

MAT 011
Arithmetic I
1 Credit
Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division  of  whole  numbers . This module includes solving simple word problems and the order  of  operations .

MAT 018A
Arithmetic II
1 Credit
Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of common fractions and mixed numerals . This module includes solving equations and word problems and the order of operations .
Skills prerequisite: MAT 011. Skills corequisite: ENG 010.

MAT 018B
Arithmetic III
1 Credit
A study of decimals . This module includes conversion to decimals and fractions,  rounding,  and  word  problems involving  rates, ratios,  and  proportions .
Skills prerequisite: MAT 018A.

MAT 018C
Arithmetic IV
1 Credit
A study of percents and geometry and their applications . This module includes conversion with decimals  and  fractions to percent problems and applications . A brief introduction to basic geometry  formulae  and  applications  is  included .
Skills prerequisite: MAT 018B.

MAT 028A
Elementary Algebra I
1 Credit
Focuses  on  solving  linear  equations  and  inequalities  in  one  variable .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and MAT 018C.


MAT 028B
Elementary Algebra II
1 Credit
Focuses   on   graphing   linear   equations   and   inequalities   in   two variables .
Skills prerequisite: MAT 028A.

MAT 028C
Elementary Algebra III
1 Credit
Focuses on solving systems of linear equations by graphing, substitution and elimination . This module also introduces polynomials.
Skills prerequisite: MAT 028B.

MAT 029A
Elementary Algebra IV
1 Credit
Focuses  on  factoring  polynomials.
Skills prerequisite: MAT 028C or MAT 028.

MAT 029B
Elementary Algebra V
1 Credit
Focuses   on   operating   with   rational   expressions   and   solving rational  equations .
Skills prerequisite: MAT 029A.

MAT 029C
Elementary Algebra VI
1 Credit
Focuses  on  manipulating  square  roots  and  solving  square  root and  quadratic  equations .
Skills prerequisite: MAT 029B.

MAT 102A
College Algebra I
1 Credit ■ MA/ma
Linear  equations  and  inequalities,  graphs,  functions  and  systems of equations . This module includes compound inequalities, ab- solute value inequalities, function notation, linear functions and systems  of  equations  in  three variables.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and MAT 029C or MAT 029.


MAT 102B
College Algebra II
1 Credit ■ MA/ma
Radical expressions, equations and functions and quadratic functions and equations . This module includes radical functions, simplifying and performing operations on radical expressions, solving radical equations and the complex numbers . It also covers solving quadratic equations, graphing quadratic functions and solving polynomial and rational inequalities.
Prerequisite: MAT 102A.

MAT 102C
College Algebra III
1 Credit ■ MA/ma
Exponential  and  logarithmic  functions  and   the   conic   sections . This  module  includes  inverse  and  composite functions,  properties of logarithmic and exponential functions, solving exponential and logarithmic equations and mathematical  modeling  with  exponential and logarithmic functions . It also covers graphing conic sections, applications   of   conic   sections   and   nonlinear   systems of  equations.
Prerequisite: MAT 102B


 

Music

 
MUS 101
Applied Music I

1 Credit ■ HU/hu
The study of an instrument, or voice . This course is aimed at the development of performance skills and the study of appropriate literature drawn primarily from the Western  music  tradition .  Lessons taught at the Berkshire Music School require that students register at both BCC and BMS, and pay an additional fee to BMS .

MUS 102
Applied Music II

1 Credit ■ HU/hu
A  continuation  of  MUS  101 .
Prerequisite: MUS 101.

MUS 106
Fundamentals of Music
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu
A study of the fundamentals of musical language: pitch, intervals, scales,  keys,  rhythm,  and  basic   triads .   Basic keyboard   skills and principles of musical organization will also be studied, using examples from classical and popular music . Course objectives include the student learning to read, play,  and  listen  more effectively to music . No musical background is required.
Skills prerequisites: ENG 020, ENG 060 and MAT 018A.

MUS 108
Music Theory I
3 Credits   Spring ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A study of tonal harmony, beginning with a brief theory review . Course topics include: principles of voice leading; root position voice leading; harmonic progression; chords in first, second, and third inversions; cadences, phrases and periods, and non-chord tones . Students will analyze and write in accordance with the principles studied .

MUS 110
American Popular Music
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
An introduction to the history and diversity of  American  popular music . This  course  begins  with  an  examination  of the  sources of  American  popular  music  and  then  follows  the  development  of popular styles up to contemporary vernacular styles . The discussions  include  folk,  blues,  gospel,  country,  jazz,  musical  theater, popular song, and rock. No musical background is required . 
Skills  prerequisite:  ENG  020  and  ENG  060.


M
US 116
Fundamental Musicianship
2 Credits ■ HU/hu
An instructor-guided  practicum  involving  sight  singing  and dictation (writing down) of melodies and phrases of easy to intermediate  level  difficulty.

MUS 120
Choral Ensemble I
1 Credit
Rehearses and performs choral works for mixed voices . The BCC Chorale prepares music of all styles, including classical, pop, jazz, and  show  tunes .  For  beginning  and  experienced  singers .

MUS 130
Choral Ensemble II
1 Credit
A  continuation  of  MUS  120 .
Prerequisite: MUS 120.

MUS 132
Recording Technology I
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
An instructor-guided course  in  digital  and  analog  recording techniques .  Students  will  learn  to  author  sound  and music  on a personal computer using SONAR software . Using the tutorials embedded in the  software,  students  will gain  skill  in  understanding and manipulating the tools which will help produce group and individual  projects.
Skills prerequisite: Basic computer literacy.

 

MUS 136
American Musical Theatre

3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu
A thorough investigation of the history and structure of American musical theatre . Lectures and demonstrations  will  be  augmented with films and  recordings .  Students  will  prepare  and  present scenes and songs from selected musical plays, illustrating integration of libretto,  score  and  dance  in  American  musical  theatre . No  music  background  is required.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.


M
US 138
Class Piano I

1 Credit ■ HU/hu
An introduction to playing the piano . The class will focus on reading and playing music, keyboard technique, sight-reading, transposing,  and  improvising  at  the  piano .

 

MUS 139
Class Piano II

1 Credit ■ hu
A continuation of MUS 138 with an intermediate focus on reading and playing music, keyboard technique, sight-reading, transposing and improvising at the piano .
Prerequisite: MUS 138.

MUS 141
Introduction to Jazz
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu
A  chronological  and  stylistic  investigation  of   jazz .   Beginning with a study of the roots of jazz in African  music  and blues,  the course  will  examine  Dixieland,  swing,  bebop,   post-bebop,   cool jazz, avant-garde, modern, and fusion styles through  lectures, listening, videos, and live performances . The effect of  jazz  on other musical styles will also be studied . No musical background is required .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

MUS 145
World Music
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu
A survey of the indigenous musics of Africa, South and North America, Eastern Europe, India, Southeast Asia, and East Asia . Emphasis will be placed  on  the  interrelationships  between  music and society . Course work will include lecture, listening, live performances, videos, and student experiments in  performance  of non-Western  music .  No  musical background  is  required.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

MUS 151
Instrumental Ensemble I
1 Credit
Rehearsal and public performance as part of area instrumental ensembles, under the supervision of BCC music faculty . These ensembles include the Eagles Concert Band, Pittsfield Red Knights Drum and Bugle Corps, and area African percussion groups .
Prerequisite: intermediate-level proficiency on a traditional band, symphonic or folk instrument and permission of the instructor.


MUS 152

Instrumental Ensemble II
1  Credit
A  continuation  of  MUS  151.
Prerequisite: MUS 151.

MUS 156
Musicianship I
2  Credits  ■  HU/hu
An  instructor-guided  practicum  involving  sight  singing  and dictation (writing down) of melodies and phrases of beginning to intermediate  level .
Prerequisite: MUS 116.

MUS 163
Jazz Ensemble I
1 Credit ■ HU/hu
A study of the major principles of small group jazz performance . Students   develop    repertoire,    apply    appropriate   chord/scales to improvisation and accompaniment, participate in ensemble rehearsals  and  perform  publicly.
Prerequisite: Ability to read music and play an instrument or sing.

MUS 164
Jazz Ensemble II
1 Credit ■ HU/hu
A  continuation  of  MUS  163.
Prerequisite: MUS 163 or permission of the instructor.

MUS 185
Computer Music Notation
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu
The study and practice of computer music  notation .  Finale  soft- ware will be utilized to allow students to create music manuscripts/ scores at the computer . Using the college Midi lab, students will explore topics such as  note  entry, notational  details,  articulations and expressions, page layout and  working  with  scores  and  parts . Lab time will be provided for individual practice .
Prerequisites: MUS 108 and MUS 156 or permission of the instructor.

MUS 187
Music Theory II
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
In the context of tonal harmony, course consideration of diatonic seventh chords, secondary functions, modulations using diatonic common chords, other modulatory  techniques  and  binary  and ternary forms .  Students  will  analyze  and write  in  style  according to the principles studied . Finale music notation  software  will  be used in this course .
Prerequisite: C or better in MUS 108 or permission of the instructor.

MUS 201
Applied Music III
2 Credits ■ HU/hu
A continuation of MUS  102  intended  for  music  majors .  Students will develop  more  advanced  performance  skills and  will  complete at least one public performance as defined by the student and instructor .
Prerequisite: MUS 102 and permission of instructor and music program advisor.

MUS 202
Applied Music IV
2 Credits ■ HU/hu
A continuation of MUS  201  intended  for  music  majors .  Students will develop  more  advanced  performance  skills and  will  complete at least one public performance as defined by the student and instructor .
Prerequisite: MUS 201 and permission of instructor and music program advisor.

MUS 216
Musicianship II
2 Credits  HU/hu
An instructor-guided  practicum  involving  sight  singing  and dictation (writing down) of melodies and phrases of advanced difficulty . Sight Singing/Ear Training music software may be used in this course.
Prerequisite: MUS 156.

MUS 220
Choral Ensemble III
1 Credit
A  continuation  of  MUS  130
Prerequisite: MUS 130.


MUS 225
Music History I
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT ■ CC-OC
An introduction to the  principal  styles  and  masterworks  of  western music from the Middle Ages to 1750 . Students will investigate Gregorian chant, Renaissance sacred and secular works, and  the music of Baroque masters Bach, Handel, Vivaldi, and  Purcell . Music is examined through lecture, listening,  and  video  presentations.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: MUS 108.

MUS 226
Music History II
3 Credits ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT ■ CC-WC
An introduction to the principal  styles  and  masterworks  of Western music from 1750  to the 21st century .  Students will investigate the music of such composers as Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Stravinsky, and Copland . Music is examined through lecture,  listening,  and  video  presentations .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: MUS 108.

MUS 230
Choral Ensemble IV
1 Credit
A  continuation  of  MUS  220.
Prerequisite: MUS 220.

MUS 232
Recording Technology II
3 Credits
An instructor-guided course in live studio recording techniques . Students will use PRO TOOLS software to record and produce live musical performances using microphone  placement  techniques taught by  the  instructor .  Multi-tracking, final  editing  and  mix- downs of performances will also be studied.
Prerequisite: MUS 132.

MUS 251
Instrumental Ensemble III
1 Credit
A  continuation  of  MUS  152 .
Prerequisite: MUS 152.


MUS 252
Instrumental Ensemble IV
1 Credit
A  continuation  of  MUS  251 .
Prerequisite: MUS 251.

MUS 263
Jazz Ensemble III

1 Credit ■ HU/hu
A  continuation  of  MUS  164,  Jazz  Ensemble  II .
Prerequisite: MUS 164 or permission of the instructor.

MUS 264
Jazz Ensemble IV
1 Credit ■ HU/hu
A  continuation  of  MUS  263,  Jazz  Ensemble  III .
Prerequisite: MUS 263 or permission of the instructor.

MUS 275
Independent Study in Music
1-3 Credits
Student  and  instructor  determine  the  project  and  the  number  of credits to be earned .
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

MUS 297
Special Topics in Music
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
Specific   course   content   at   the   discretion   of   the   department . Details  are  included  in  preregistration  materials.

 


Nursing/ADN


NU
R 101

Physical and Mental Health I
9 Credits ■ Fall ■ HF ■ CC-CT
Introduction to  nursing  theory,  process,  and  practice.  Nursing theory includes an introduction to the individual as a consumer of health care and  the  nurse  as  a  health  care  professional,  focusing on health promotion  and  wellness .  The  normal  variations  of the culturally diverse individual throughout  the  developmental phases   and   the   physiological,   safety,   and   interactional   needs in relationship to maintaining homeostasis are studied . Nursing practice includes the application  of  the  scientific  principles  and the performance of basic psychomotor skills utilized  in  meeting client needs  in  varied  settings .  The  role  of  the  nurse  as  provider of care, manager of care and member within the discipline of nursing are introduced . Beginning assessment skills in the collection and analysis of simple types of data are emphasized . The elements of critical thinking are introduced through a variety of learning activities including journaling, case studies, Internet assignments and test taking skills . Service learning is introduced in this course and focuses on health promotion and  application  of newly acquired skills in a supervised setting.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Nursing Program.
Corequisite: BIO 201, and ENG 101 or ENG 103, and PSY 107.



NUR 102
Physical and Mental Health II

8 Credits ■ Spring ■ HF ■ CC-CT
Development of nursing theory, practice, and process . Nursing theory includes the utilization of the principles of therapeutic communication with individuals as consumers of health care; the collaborative role of the nurse as an active member of the health team; the complex physiological principles  from  homeostasis through resolution in relation to  human  needs,  developmental phases, and the client/nurse relationship;  and  the  interrelation- ship among physical, safety, and  interactional  needs .  Nursing practice includes the performance with dexterity of basic  psycho- motor skills and health promotion and maintenance as  components of therapeutic nursing care in a variety of settings . Nursing process includes the collection  of  a  broader  scope  of  data  and the analysis  of  multiple  types  of  data  for  the purpose  of  arriving at a nursing diagnosis in order to plan, implement, and evaluate nursing care . The elements of critical thinking and the role of the nurse as a provider of care, manager of care, and member within the  discipline  of nursing  are  developed  and  reinforced.
Prerequisite: BIO 201 and ENG 101 or ENG 103 and NUR 101 and PSY 107.
Corequisite: BIO 202 and BIO 207 and PSY 204.


 

NUR 106
LPN to RN Bridge
2 Credits
An introduction to  the  organizing  framework  of  the  ADN  program for LPN's . The principles of the nursing process and the elements of critical thinking will be refined . The role of the associate degree nurse as provider of  care,  manager  of  care,  and  member  within the discipline of nursing will  be  defined .  The  role  transition  from LPN to ADN Nursing will be discussed .
Prerequisites: PSY 107, PSY 204, BIO 201, BIO 202, BIO 207, ENG 101, current LPN licensure and admission into the nursing program.

NUR 201
Physical and Mental Health III
9 Credits ■ Fall ■ HF ■ CC-CT ■ CC-WC
Refinement of  nursing  theory,  practice,  and  process .  Nursing theory includes the interrelationship among human needs, developmental phases, and client/nurse relationship . Complex psychological and physiological principles are emphasized from homeostasis through resolution . Nursing practice includes the performance with efficiency of basic psychomotor skills as a component of therapeutic nursing care in a variety of settings . Additionally,  it  includes  the knowledge   of   scientific   principles and their application in performing advanced psychomotor skills necessary to meet human needs . Nursing process includes the collection and interpretation of complex data for the purpose of arriving at a nursing diagnosis in order to plan, implement, and evaluate nursing care . The elements  of  critical  thinking  and  the role of the nurse as provider of care, manager of care, and member within the discipline of nursing are refined.
Prerequisites: BIO 202, NUR 102 and PSY 204. NUR 106 is required for all LPN mobility students.
Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 207.
Co-requisites: COM 104, COM 105, COM 106 or COM 107 and SOC 105.

NUR 202
Physical and Mental Health IV
9 Credits ■ Spring ■ CC-QR
Completion of  nursing  theory,  practice,  and  process .  Nursing theory includes the more complex interrelationship that results in alterations  among  human  needs,  developmental  phases,  and  the client/nurse  relationship .  Causal complexity  of  psychological  and physiological  principles  is  emphasized  from homeostasis through   resolution . Nursing   practice   includes   the   performance with proficiency of therapeutic nursing interventions in a variety of settings . The components of the nursing  process  are  integrated with proficiency to achieve holistic nursing practice . The elements of critical thinking and the role of the nurse as provider of care, manager of care, and member within the discipline of nursing are integrated and focused on professional and entry-level practice issues .

Prerequisite: COM 104, COM 105, COM 106 or COM 107, NUR 201 and SOC 105. 
Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 104, NUR 206, and an elective in history or humanities and fine arts.

NUR 206
Nursing in Transition

1 Credit ■ Spring
Application of nursing concepts related to the nurse as a member of the  health  care  profession  and  the  individual  as a consumer of health care . The role of the nurse is emphasized in relation to the historical development of the profession; legal and ethical issues faced by nurses today;  various  educational,  employment and community service options in  nursing;  and  leadership  roles and  responsibilities .
Prerequisite: NUR 201.
Co-requisite: NUR 202.

 

Nursing/LPN                        

LPN 142
Health Maintenance of the Adult and Aging
15 Credits ■ HF ■ CC-CT ■ CC-WC
Theoretical and clinical application of basic nursing skills at the practical nurse  level  related to  maintaining  homeostasis in  the adult  and  aging .  Course  components  include  nursing  theory, nursing   process,   client/nurse   relationship,   ethical   and   legal issues,  and  the  development  of  basic  psychomotor  skills  in  a long-term care facility . Ten hours of class time and fifteen hours of laboratory weekly . A service learning component is required . Prerequisite:  Admission  to  the  Practical  Nursing  Program.

LPN 145
Gerontology Practicum
2 Credits ■ CC-OC
A  three-week  intensive  clinical  practicum  to  reinforce  competency in basic nursing theory, practice, and assessment of aging clients . Participation in the formulation of a written nursing care plan is emphasized . Pass/No Pass grading.
Prerequisite: LPN 142.

LPN 152
Health Alterations of the Adult and Aging
15 Credits
A continuation of basic nursing theory and more advanced clinical practice . Course components include nursing theory and nursing process, broadened to include assessment planning, implementation, and evaluation . Clinical practice occurs in a long-term care and acute care facility . Ten hours of class time and fifteen hours of laboratory weekly . A service learning component is required.
Prerequisite:  LPN  145.

LPN 162
Health Care of the Family
6 Credits ■ CC-CT
Completion  of  basic  nursing  theory  and  clinical  practice  related to the care of the family, newborn to aging . Course components include nursing theory, nursing process, human growth and development, and role transition from  student  to entry-level practice . Clinical practice occurs in community, acute care and long-term care settings . Six hours of class time and 26 hours of laboratory weekly . Pass/No Pass grading.
Prerequisite: LPN 152.


Philosophy

 

PHL 101
Philosophy and Self-Identity

3 Credits ■ HU/hu ■ CC-WC
An examination of many aspects of self- awareness and personal identity . Assigned readings and class discussions survey  the  human quest for meaning and self-identity as it appears in the fields of  philosophy,  religion,  sociology,  and psychology.

PHL 102
Introduction to Philosophy
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
An  introductory  course  exploring  some  of  the  basic  questions, ideas,  and  theories  concerning  the  nature  of reality,  the  acquisition  of  knowledge,  ethical  behavior,  the  religious  quest,  and  the human  future,  primarily  as  developed  in  Western  thought .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.

PHL 105
World Security and Sustainability
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu
An examination of a wide variety of problems that stand in the way of national  and  individual  security  and  a sustainable  approach to global survival . The course explores the design  of  solutions  to these  problems .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.

PHL 111
Alternatives to Violence
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ HU/hu
A study of some of the origins of societal violence and successful alternatives to violence . This course includes an introduction to negotiation and conflict resolution techniques . It also includes several field trips to area agencies concerned  with  violence reduction .

PHL 209
Ethics
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A  study  of  contrasting  approaches   to   ethical   decision-making. This course includes application of moral theory to major current problems  facing  the  individual  and  society.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.


PHL 270
Independent Study in Peace and World Order
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
An individually tailored course for the Peace and World Order Studies student . Typical projects may include research, creative writing,  local  organizing,  project-related  travel  and evaluation, and teaching internships . Participants meet frequently with the instructor  to  discuss  projects  and  results.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Peace and World Order Studies concentration or permission of the instructor.

 

 

Physical Education

 

PED 106
Self-Defense I
2 Credits ■ HF
An introduction to basic self-defense  concepts  and  techniques . This course emphasizes self-care as self-defense which utilizes methods to avoid becoming a victim . Topics include assessment, assertiveness, verbal resistance, and various levels of physical responses  to  conflict  situations .  A  ten-week  course .

 

PED 109
Introduction to Badminton
1 Credit ■ HF
An introduction to the fundamental skills of badminton which emphasizes stroke  development,  strategy,  and  scoring .  Drill formations,  conditioning,  and  game  play  are  also  incorporated . A  five-week  course .

PED 115
Introduction to Volleyball
1 Credit ■ HF
An introduction to the basic fundamental skills of the bump, serve, set, and spike . Drill work, conditioning, and skill development are applied during game play . A five-week course .

PED 116
Introduction to Golf
1 Credit ■ HF
An introduction to the fundamentals of golf . The  swing,  equipment, terminology, and golf course etiquette are emphasized . A five-week  course .

PED 128
Introduction to Tennis
1 Credit ■ As Needed ■ HF
An introduction to the basic skills, rules, and terminology of tennis . The  course  focuses  on  skills  practice  and  game play.  Equipment is provided . A five-week course .

PED 130
Introduction to Aikido
1  Credit  ■  HF
An introduction to  basic  principles  of  Aikido,  a  Japanese  martial art . Emphasis will be on feeling and maintaining a strong center (known as the hara), progressive relaxation through movement, correct posture, and positive mind . Students  will  observe  and then practice Aikido techniques,  Ki  exercises,  and  learn  how  to fall and roll correctly . This class  will allow students  to experience both the attacker (uke) and defender (nage) roles . A five-week course .

PED 135
Ultimate Functional Training Workout
2  Credits ■ HF
An intense total body workout  that combines interval, cardio,  and muscle conditioning exercises . Agility ladders, stability balls, free weight and medicine balls  are  used  in  this  course .  All  exercises are modified and individualized for each participant . All  fitness levels are welcome .

PED 136
Weight Training
1 Credit ■ HF
A  preparatory  course  emphasizing  long-term  personal maintenance through the use of free weights, machines  and functional equipment . The course topics  include  a  variety  of strength training routines and safety guidelines in the use of all equipment.

PED 137
Aerobics
1 Credit ■ HF
Introduction to an  aerobic  exercise  program  designed  to  improve the cardiovascular system . Aerobic programs are developed  to meet individual needs . A five-week course .

PED 144
Stretching and Flexibility
1 Credit ■ HF
A practical study of stretching theories and methods used to increase flexibility. Special attention will be paid to using flexibility as a tool to injury prevention and healing .

PED 151
Cardio Boot Camp
1  Credit  ■  HF
A  military-style  circuit  workout  featuring   high-intensity conditioning and power moves . Circuit training workouts  are designed to improve athletic performance through cardiovascular conditioning, strength training exercises  and  sports-specific drills. This course requires a high level of physical activity.

PED 152
Group Exercise Instruction
2  Credits ■ HF
A preparatory class for those interested in teaching group exercise classes either  privately  or  commercially .  This course  is  designed to prepare the student for national certifications.  Students  will learn to design and teach exercise classes of their own . A basic understanding of major muscle groups and their relationship to exercise is  also covered.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: Current CPR certification; PED 180 or permission of the instructor.

PED 160
Muscle Strength and Conditioning
1 Credit ■ HF
An exploration of various resistance-training techniques to improve muscular strength and endurance . The use of these techniques develop muscle definition and elevate the body's metabolism by increasing  lean  muscle  mass .

PED 161
Advanced Strength Training
1 Credit ■ HF
An  exploration  of  muscular  strength  assessment  and   development. Resistive training principles, modes and methodologies will be addressed in detail .  Practical  considerations  and  application will be an integral part of the course  components. Guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine will provide the foundation  for  the course. 
Prerequisite: PED 136 or permission of the instructor.


PED 170
Personal Trainer
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ CC-CT ■ CC-QR
A course designed to prepare students for the national ACE Personal Trainer certification . Students will be exposed to the most current and complete information, instructional techniques and professional skills personal trainers need to provide safe and effective exercise programs to their clients . Students will under- stand the basic principles and skills inherent to personal training .
Skills  prerequisites:  ENG  020  and  ENG  060.
Prerequisites: Current CPR certification. AHS 142 or permission of the instructor.

PED 180
Fitness for Life
2 Credits ■ HF
A nontechnical study of lifetime fitness . Topics include fitness starter programs, nutritional and weight loss information, and self-behavior  modification  tec hniques .  A  ten-week  course .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 060.

PED 196
Practicum I
1 Credit
The program requires a 100  hour  practicum  experience  for students in the Physical Fitness Certificate Program . This course fulfills the first half of this requirement . Students will receive instruction  in  skills,  concepts  and  information necessary   to work with  clients .  Students  are  required  to  complete  50  hours of observation and participation in community fitness programs . Emphasis will be on the ability to assess,  analyze  and  interpret client data . Students will be  required  to  have  liability  insurance and  have  CORI/SORI  checks .
Prerequisite: Admission to the Physical Fitness certificate or degree program.

PED 197
Practicum II
1  Credit
A continuation of the  practicum  experience.  This  course  fulfills the second half of the 100 hour requirement for students in the Physical Fitness Certificate Program. Students  will design and implement safe and effective exercise programs for clients.  Students are required to complete 50 hours working with  apparently healthy clients in  the  Paterson  Fitness Center.  Emphasis  will  be on  motivating  and  educating  individual  clients.
Prerequisite: AHS 148 and PED 196. Admission to the Physical Fitness Certificate or Physical Fitness Degree Program.


PED 207
Prevention and Care of Exercise Injuries
2  Credits ■ HF ■ CC-QR
An integration of exercise physiology and risk of injury/benefit to specific exercises . The role of  the  personal  trainer  in recognizing and monitoring situations for potential injury, identifying effects of exercise in the presence of injury, and determining need for medical referral is emphasized . Specific medical conditions and client presentations such as back pain,  arthritis,  postural  imbalance, and acute/chronic injury will be explored.
Prerequisite: AHS 142 or permission of the instructor.

PED 241
Advanced Practicum I
1 Credit
An  advanced  practical  experience  for  the  Physical  Fitness  Degree student . Students will demonstrate a higher level of skill in designing  integrated  fitness  training  for  special  populations .  Emphasis will  be  on  stability/mobility exercises,  movement,  movement  with resistance  and  performance  enhancing  skills .  Students  will  be  re- quired  to complete  50  hours  of  practical  experience  working  with clients in the Paterson Fitness Center . Students will be required to have  liability  insurance  and  have  CORI/SORI  checks .   
Prerequisite:  PED  170  and  PED  197.

PED 242
Advanced Practicum II
1 Credit
The final practicum experience of the curriculum . Under the supervision of a certified physical fitness trainer, the student uses the skills learned throughout the previous semesters to implement, design, and market exercise programs . Emphasis will be placed on special needs assessments, exercise adherence and client-trainer  relationships.
Prerequisite: PED 241

PED 250
Psychology of Sport
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ HF
Exploration of the psychological  dynamics  of  sports .  Topics include aggression in sport, playing to play versus playing to win, personality factors of coach and athlete, motivating teams and athletes,  and  crowd  behavior .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.


PED 284
ACE Advanced Health and Fitness Specialist
3 Credits ■ HF
A course designed to provide theoretical knowledge and practical skills in preparation for a national certification exam in advanced health and fitness, which encompasses working with clients with various health challenges . Topics include: guidelines for instructing safe and effective exercise for clients with cardiovascular and pulmonary disorders, metabolic diseases, musculoskeletal disorders, and other specialized population groups; essentials of the fitness professional; client relationship as well as the fitness professional-healthcare community relationship; and the Advanced Health and Fitness Specialist's professional role .
Prerequisites: PED 170, PED 196, PED 197, PED 241 and  PED 242. Current adult CPR and AED certification. AHS 142 or current ACE Personal Trainer certification, Lifestyle and Weight Management certification; or an NCAA-accredited Personal Trainer or advanced fitness related certification; or have a four year (bachelor's) degree in an Exercise Science or related field at the time of registration and submit supporting documentation. 300 hours of work experience designing and implementing exercise programs for apparently healthy individuals and/or high risk individuals as documented by a qualified professional at the time of registration. Permission of the program advisor is required.


 

Physical Therapist Asst.

 

  PTA 100
Introduction to Physical Therapy
2 Credits ■ Fall ■ HF
An introduction to the philosophy, history, and practice of physical therapy . This course examines the relationship of the physical therapist assistant to the licensed physical therapist, and to other members of the health care team . Laboratory exercises include instruction  in  body  mechanics,  lifting  techniques,  basic  patient care skills, and preparation of patient and treatment areas.
Prerequisite:  Admission  to  PTA  program.
Co-requisite: PTA 102, BIO 201 and PHY 111.

PTA 101
Physical Therapist Assistant I
4 Credits ■ Spring ■ CC-CT
An  introduction  to  the  basic  principles  and  applications  of  various physical  therapy  methods  and  treatment techniques .  This  course includes   the   study   of   the   physiological   effects   of   heat,   cold, massage,    and   electrotherapy .    The    course    also    provides    an introduction  to  documentation  and  record  keeping .        Prerequisite:  PTA  100,  PTA  102,  BIO  201,  and  PHY  111.
Co-requisite: PTA 115 and BIO 202.

PTA 102
Structural Anatomy
3 Credits ■ Fall
An introduction to the structural anatomy of the human body . This course is designed to emphasize surface palpation and musculo-skeletal anatomy . The course will  include  anatomical  palpations and  orthopedic  data collection.
Prerequisite: Admission to PTA Program.
Co-requisite: PTA 100, BIO 201 and PHY 111.

PTA 115
Functional Anatomy
3   Credits ■ Spring ■ CC-CT
A study of the bio-mechanical and physiological functions of the musculoskeletal system . This course  compares  clinical dysfunction to normal human movement.  Manual  muscle  testing,  gait, and balance will also be included in this course.
Prerequisite: PTA 100, PTA 102, PHY 111 and BIO 201.
Co-requisite: PTA 101 and BIO 202.


PTA 150
Clinical Education I
2  Credits  ■  Summer
The  first  of  three  clinical  education  courses  scheduled  for  the summer  between  the  first  and  second  year  of  the  Physical Therapist Assistant program . The student is placed in a physical therapy facility under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist or physical therapist assistant to practice the procedures and treatments learned in the classroom and laboratory during the first year . 160 hours of clinical laboratory . Pass/No pass grading .
Prerequisites:  PTA  101,  PTA  115,  and  a  current  Community CPR  card.

PTA 200
Rehab Neurology
3  Credits ■ Fall ■ CC-CT
An overview of functional neuroanatomy and normal human development .  Students  will  investigate  the  pathological consequences of neurological damage and the  rehabilitation  procedures  associated  with  neurological  dysfunction Prerequisites: BIO 202, PTA 101 and PTA 115.
Co-requisite: PTA 202.

PTA 201
Physical Therapist Assistant II
2 Credits ■ Fall ■ CC-WC
A continuation of the study of Physical Therapist Assistant procedures with emphasis on problem solving approaches to the treatment of dysfunction related  to  the  musculoskeletal,  cardiac and integumentary systems .  The  course  is designed  to  develop an understanding of  the  underlying  principles  of  advanced  physical  therapy  treatment methods.
Prerequisites: PTA 200 and PTA 202.
Co-requisite: PTA 203.

PTA 202
Therapeutic Exercise
4 Credits ■ Fall
An introduction to the physiological effects  of  exercise  and  common approaches to therapeutic exercise . Joint mechanics and range of motion are reviewed . Techniques of exercise for various regions of the human body, including exercise  for  spinal  dysfunction, will  be  discussed.
Prerequisite: PTA 101, PTA 115 and BIO 202.
Co-requisite: PTA 200.

PTA 203
Physical Therapist Assistant Seminar
3  Credits  ■  Spring  ■  CC-OC
A presentation of case studies relevant to previous or current clinical experiences . This course includes discussions of contemporary health issues, ethics, governmental involvement  in physical therapy, fiscal considerations, and other topics of student interest . This course integrates skills  developed  in  the  classroom and clinic with students' recognition of their own strengths and limitations .
Prerequisite: PTA 200 and PTA 202.
Co-requisite: PTA 201.

PTA 250
Clinical Education II
4  Credits ■ Fall ■ CC-OC
An  application  of  advanced  physical  therapist  assistant  procedures . The student is assigned to work under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist or a physical therapist assistant . The student  improves  clinical  skills gained  in  previous  courses .  This is the second clinical education segment . 240 hours of clinical laboratory . Pass/No Pass grading.
Prerequisites: PTA 150, Clinical Competency Practical Exam, and a current CPR card.

PTA 260
Clinical Education III
4 Credits ■ Spring ■ CC-OC
The final clinical education segment  of  the  curriculum .  The student, under supervision of  a  licensed  physical therapist  or physical therapist assistant, uses skills learned throughout the previous three  semesters .  Each  student  meets  a  specified  level of competency in a combination of skills related to the physical therapist assistant profession . 240 hours of clinical laboratory . Pass/No Pass grading.
Prerequisite: PTA 250 and a current Community CPR card.


 

Physics                            


PHY 101
College Physics I
4  Credits ■ Fall ■ SC/ls ■ CC-QR
A vector  study  of  mechanics including  static  and  dynamic  equilibrium, kinematics and dynamics of plane motion, friction, gravity, energy, work, power, impulse, and momentum . The kinetic model of matter, thermometry, and thermal processes is also covered in lecture  and  laboratory.
Prerequisite: ENM 127, MAT 102 or equivalent.

PHY 102
College Physics II

4 Credits ■ Spring ■ SC/ls ■ CC-CT
A study of wave motion, including vibrations and pendulum; of sound, including resonance, beats, and the Doppler effect; of light, including reflection, refraction, and dispersion; and of static and current electricity, including capacitance, magnetism, inductance, and circuits . The course also covers electrical machines and phenomena, plus topics from modern physics .    
Prerequisite: PHY 101 or permission of the instructor.

PHY 111
The Ideas of Physics
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ SC
A physics course designed for the student who is not science oriented but who would benefit from a study of the principles of physical science . Technical and mathematical terms are minimal . An understanding of physical concepts and phenomena is developed.
Prerequisite: One year of algebra or permission of the instructor.

 

Psychology

PSY 107
Introductory Psychology

3 Credits ■ SS/ss
A traditional introductory course in psychology . Topics include research methods and experimental design, biology and behavior, development, learning and conditioning, intelligence and memory, sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, theories of personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy . A prerequisite for many other psychology courses.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

PSY 122
Women and Self-Esteem
1 Credit ■ All Terms ■ HF
A hands-on, experiential course designed to build wellness through self-esteem . Topics will include self-expression, assertiveness and communication skills, confidence-building,  self-acceptance,  and stress reduction . Activities will include art and writing  projects, group  discussions,  role-playing,  and  relaxation  exercises .

PSY 127
Developing Resiliency
1 Credit ■ As Needed ■ HF
An examination of the components of resiliency and how  they relate to academic and personal success . This course focuses on the major factors that influence resiliency or the ability to bounce back” after life’s challenges including developing community, optimism  and  personal  control .
Skills prerequisite: ENG 010.

PSY 204
Human Growth and Development
3 Credits ■ SS/ss
A survey of the psychological, physiological, and  social  development of humans, with emphasis on 'normal' growth . Students examine the various factors determining developmental tasks at stages throughout the life span . Life stages covered in the course extend from pre-natal to death as the final stage of development.
Prerequisite:   PSY 107.


P
SY 207
Social Psychology
3  Credits  ■  As  Needed  ■  SS/ss
A survey of interpersonal, group, and institutional influences on human behavior . The course examines the dynamics of attraction,  conformity,  social  cognition,  self-justification,  prejudice, aggression,  and  attitude  formation .  The  role  of  ideology  and  the media will also be explored .

Prerequisite: PSY 107.

PSY 208
Interviewing and Counseling
3  Credits ■ Fall ■ SS/ss ■ CC-CT
An introductory course for students interested  in  gaining  an overview of basic counseling theories and techniques . Students examine interview goals and structure, the characteristics and dynamics of helping relationships, and stages in counseling relationships . Using simulations and  videotapes,  students  practice counseling techniques and identify representative types of client  behaviors.
Prerequisite: PSY 107.

PSY 210
Psychology of the Mass Media
4  Credits  ■  SS/ss
A seminar critiquing  the  ideological  assumptions  that  shape  daily life and national policy . Based on a study of cognitive dissonance and attribution theories, we will examine the means  by  which mass media, propaganda, and psychological mechanisms may combine to  convince a  population that  irrational beliefs and  inhumane policies are normative and just . Employing the perspectives of  social  psychology,  sociology,  and  political  science,  this  course is designed for those with advanced reading skills who are comfortable with  nonfiction,  non-textbook  materials .  Students  should be willing to  participate actively  in discussions.
Prerequisite: SOC 105 or permission of the instructor.

PSY 226
Abnormal  Psychology
3 Credits ■ SS/ss
This course covers the history of mental illness and its treatment, approaches to prevention, research  methods,  modern classification  and  diagnosis,  and  causes  of  disorders .
Prerequisite: PSY 107.


PSY 275
Independent Study in Psychology
1-3 Credits
Independent study for students with a foundation in the field . Student and instructor determine the project to be worked on and the number of credits to be earned . Regularly scheduled meetings between student and instructor are required . Pass/No Pass or traditional grading.
Prerequisite: PSY 107, and permission of the instructor and the department chair or program advisor.

PSY 297
Special Topics in Psychology

1-3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ SS/ss
Specific   course   content   at   the   discretion   of   the   department . Details  are  in  preregistration materials. 
Prerequisite: PSY 107.


RESpiratory Care

 

RSP 105
Respiratory Care I: Theory and Practice
7 Credits ■ Spring ■ HF
An introduction to the theory and clinical practice of basic respiratory care procedures . This lecture, laboratory and applied clinical practice course covers all the basic  respiratory  care  procedures used in the clinical setting . Students learn the theory and develop the basic skills used in respiratory care including infection control, vital sign measurement, oxygen therapy, aerosol therapy, chest physiotherapy  and  medical  record  keeping .
Prerequisite: Admission to Respiratory Care program. 
Co-requisite: CHM 150 and BIO 201.

RSP 107
Respiratory Care Practicum
2 Credits ■ Summer
A clinical experience in which the student applies the principles learned in RSP 105 . Topics include  more  advanced  respiratory care procedures such as arterial blood gas puncture, manual resuscitation, and tracheobronchial aspiration . Pass/No Pass grading.
Prerequisite: RSP 105.

RSP 205
Respiratory Care II: Theory and Practice
7 Credits ■ Fall
Development   of   the   theory   and   clinical   practice   in   respiratory care  focusing  on  the  critical  care  setting .  This lecture,  laboratory and applied  clinical  practice  course  analyzes  the  different  types of artificial airways, the physics of various types of mechanical ventilators, the  management of  the patient-ventilator  circuit, ventilator trouble-shooting, and ventilator discontinuance . In the clinical experience, particular attention is given  to  the  mechanically  ventilated  patient.
Prerequisite: RSP 107.
Co-requisite: RSP 241.

RSP 207
Respiratory Care III: Theory and Practice
8 Credits ■ Spring
Completion  of  the  theory  and  clinical  skills  in  respiratory  care focusing on the critical care setting . Clinical topics include critical care units pulmonary function labs, neonatal intensive care units and nursing home facilities . Elective rotations include home care, EMT training, RC management, community service and pulmonary rehabilitation . This lecture, laboratory and applied clinical practice course analyzes the skills needed in the laboratory and clinical experience,  including  neonatal  respiratory  care,  hemodynamic monitoring,  pulmonary  function  studies,  neurological intensive care and ECG monitoring . An additional 1 hour seminar class to debrief on the clinical experiences is also required .    
Prerequisite:  RSP  205  and  241.

RSP 241
Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology
2  Credits ■ Fall ■ CC-QR
A study of the gross and microscopic structure and function of the human  cardiopulmonary  system .  Topics  include heart  and  lung anatomy,  acid-base  balance,  and  the  physiology  of  respiration .
Prerequisite:  RSP 107.
Co-requisite: RSP 205.

 

Sociology


S
OC 105

Introductory Sociology
3  Credits  ■  SS/ss
The nature and scope of sociology . In this study of human groups and relationships, the course explores the origin, structure, and growth of human society; its basic institutions and processes; and problems resulting from social change.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.

SOC 121
Human Sexuality
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ SS/ss
An interdisciplinary study of human sexuality  including  the perspectives of historical and cross cultural, biological and physiological,  psychosocial  developmental,  and  social  cultural.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020.

SOC 136
Sociology of Marriage and the Family
3 Credits  ■ As  Needed  ■ SS/ss
Analysis of the family as a basic unit of society and the chief formative influence on the shaping of personality . The American family is studied from a historical and cross-cultural perspective .
Skills  prerequisite:  ENG  020.

SOC 197
Special Topics in Sociology
1-3       Credits  ■  SS/ss
Specific   course   content   at   the   discretion   of   the   department . Details  are  in  the  preregistration  materials .

SOC 203
Issues Through Film and Video
3 Credits  ■ As  Needed  ■ SS/ss
An examination of American society in the twentieth century landscape, via film and video, as a reflection of that society . This course also looks at the medium of film  from  the  perspective  of social  issues  and  social  change .
Prerequisite: SOC 105 or PSY 107 or permission of the instructor.


SOC 208
Contemporary Social Problems
3 Credits ■ Fall  ■ SS/ss ■ CC-CT
An  analysis  of  social  problems  in  contemporary  American  society from  a  sociological  perspective .  The  course explores  theories  of problem  causes  and  proposed  solutions. 
Prerequisite: SOC 105 or PSY 107 or permission of the instructor.

SOC 212
Social Welfare and Social Policy

3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ SS/ss ■ CC-CT
An examination of the nature of the social welfare system  in  the United States . Both the  history  and  current  state  of social  policy will be examined for what they do and do not provide . This course will also compare U .S . social policy to policies in other countries. Topics will include programs targeted to poor families and the elderly,  and  health  care.
Prerequisite: SOC 105.

SOC 216
Racial and Ethnic Minorities
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ SS/ss   CC-CT
A study of the social, economic, and political conditions affecting the status of major racial and ethnic groups in the United States . Attention will be focused on selected minority groups, emphasizing immigration, intercultural conflict, accommodation, and assimilation.
Prerequisite: SOC 105 or PSY 107 or permission of the instructor.

SOC 217
Sociology of Religion
3 Credits  ■ As  Needed  ■ SS/ss
The study of religion as a social phenomenon in all its diversity in American culture . Emphasis will be on current religious life in the United States, in both traditional and new or alternative forms.
Prerequisite:  SOC  105,  PSY  107  or permission  of  the instructor.

SOC 219
Women and the Law
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ SS/ss ■ CC-OC
A study of women as victims and perpetrators of crime in America . Historical and contemporary women's lives are examined through fictional portrayal and factual data . Theories of causality, the legal status  of  women,  the  impact  of rising  female  criminality, and  the  presence  of  women  in  law  enforcement  professions  are addressed .
Prerequisite: CRJ 105 or SOC 105 and ENG 101, or permission of the instructor.

SOC 228
Death and Dying

3  Credits  ■  As  Needed  ■  SS/ss
An examination of death in American  society  from  the  perspectives of sociology, psychology, philosophy, religion, and literature . Topics include the meaning of death, the experience of dying, funeral rites, suicide, fear of death, the value of life in  American culture,  and  immortality.
Prerequisite: SOC 105 or PSY 107 or permission of the instructor.

SOC 275
Independent Study in Sociology
1-3 Credits
Independent study for students with a foundation in the field . Student and   instructor  determine   the  project   and   the number of credits to be earned . Regularly scheduled meetings between student and instructor are required . Pass/No Pass or traditional grading.
Prerequisite: SOC 105, and permission of the instructor and the department chair or program advisor.

 

SOC 297
Topical Seminar in Sociology

1-3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ SS/ss
Specific   course   content   at   the   discretion   of   the   department . Details  are  in  preregistration  materials.Prerequisite: SOC 105 or permission of the instructor.

 

Spanish


SPA 101
Introductory Spanish I
4  Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu
An introduction to Spanish, appropriate for beginners . Students develop listening and speaking skills through immersion in the language . Contextualized interactive activities as well as short reading and writing assignments teach vocabulary, elementary grammatical structures, and  Hispanic  culture .  This  class,  conducted in Spanish, meets four hours a week . One additional hour of laboratory is required.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

SPA 102
Introductory Spanish II
4 Credits ■ Spring ■ HU/hu
A continuation of SPA 101 . More complex grammatical  structures, vocabulary, and readings are presented . Students conduct interviews and debates in Spanish,  and  research  topics  on Hispanic culture . Focused drill and practice include audio, video, computer, and internet applications . This class,  conducted  in Spanish, meets four hours a week . One additional hour of laboratory is required.
Prerequisite: C- or better in SPA 101, SPA placement, or permission of the instructor.

SPA 121
Spanish Conversation I
1  Credit  ■  Intersession  ■  HU/hu
A conversation course offered during January intersession designed for students wishing to strengthen aural comprehension and oral production of materials learned in the previous level of Spanish study in order to enter the next level with enhanced skills . Students develop their listening and speaking skills by viewing Spanish language videos, learning new vocabulary on themes they covered in SPA 101, and by producing audio and/or video recordings to demonstrate their level of mastery of new materials . This is a distance learning class; students must have access to a computer with a broadband Internet connection and microphone and/or webcam. 
Prerequisite: SPA 101 or permission of the instructor. This course may be appropriate for those intending to enroll in SPA 102 who have taken at least one year of high school Spanish.


SPA 122
Spanish Conversation II
1 Credit ■ Summer ■ hu
A conversation course offered during the summer designed for students wishing to strengthen aural comprehension and oral production of materials learned in the previous level of Spanish study in order to enter the next level with enhanced skills . Students develop their listening and speaking skills by viewing Spanish language videos, learning new vocabulary on themes they covered in SPA 102, and by producing audio and/or video recordings that use the material being reviewed . This is a distance learning class; students must have access to a computer with a broadband Internet connection and microphone and/or webcam.
Prerequisite: SPA 102 or permission of the instructor. This course may be appropriate for those intending to enroll in SPA 201 who have taken at least one and a half years of high school  Spanish.

SPA 131
Spanish for the Workplace I
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
A  course  for  those  who  expect  to  interact  with  Spanish  speakers in the workplace . Designed to enable students to communicate in job-related situations, this course covers basic  Spanish  language skills and strategies as well as issues involved in cross-cultural communication.

SPA 132
Spanish for the Workplace II
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
A continuation of SPA 131 . Complex grammatical structures are presented . Students develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in a variety of authentic contexts . Vocabulary, communicative activities, and cultural topics relate to the workplace.
Prerequisite:  SPA  131  or  permission  of  the  instructor.

SPA 133
Spanish for the Workplace III
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu
The third course in  a  sequence  for  those  who  will  need  to  serve the needs of Spanish speakers in the workplace . Designed to enable students to  communicate effectively  in Spanish in  the workplace . Presents vocabulary  of  specific usefulness  in  a variety of  workplace  situations  and grammar  of  increasing complexity .  Role-play,  communicative activities  and  analysis of instances of real-life situations in  which  they  have  used  the language will help students hone production of  spoken  Spanish; work   with   authentic   audio   materials   of   native   speakers   from Spanish-speaking countries   help   students   improve aural comprehension. Students will also learn strategies for successful   cross-cultural   communication.
Prerequisite: SPA 132 or permission of the instructor.

SPA 134
Spanish for the Workplace IV for Law Enforcement
and Firefighters
1 Credit ■ HU/hu
A course for students from the Pittsfield Police and Fire Departments  who  have  completed  the  SPA  131-133  sequence  or equivalent . Students undertake activities to enhance fluency, improve aural comprehension, and develop more sophisticated and accurate expression in Spanish for their work in the community. Students master increasingly specific and complex vocabulary and grammar that will enable them to handle emergency situations involving Spanish speakers in the community .    
Prerequisite: Completion of the SPA 131-133 sequence or permission of the instructor.

SPA 135
Spanish for the Workplace V
for Law Enforcement and Firefighters
1 Credit ■ HU/hu
A course for students from the Pittsfield Police and Fire Departments  who  have  completed  the  SPA  131-133  sequence  or equivalent. Students undertake activities to enhance fluency, improve aural comprehension, and develop more sophisticated and accurate expression in Spanish for their work in the community . Students master increasingly specific and complex vocabulary and grammar that will enable them to handle emergency situations involving Spanish speakers in the community .
Prerequisite:  SPA-134.

SPA 201
Intermediate Spanish I
4 Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu
The development of language skills and cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world through readings and discussions and authentic audio and video materials . The course is  a  review  of basic grammatical structures through  activities  emphasizing  oral and written expression in Spanish . This class, conducted in Spanish,  meets  four  hours  a  week .  One  additional  hour  of  laboratory is required.
Prerequisite: C- or better in SPA 102, SPA placement, or permission of the instructor.


SPA 202
Intermediate Spanish II
4 Credits ■ Spring ■ HU/hu
A continuation of SPA 201 . Class activities  are  designed  to  develop mastery of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in Spanish . Students work with written and audio materials of increasing difficulty to  further  promote  accuracy  and  fluency.  In  addition to studying works from Spain and Latin America, students write essays and conduct debates on contemporary topics . This class, conducted in Spanish, meets four hours  a  week .  One  additional hour of laboratory is required.
Prerequisite: C- or better in SPA 201, SPA placement, or permission of the instructor.

SPA 221
Spanish Conversation III
1  Credit  ■  Intersession  ■  HU/hu
A conversation course during January intersession designed for students wishing to strengthen aural comprehension and oral production of materials learned in the previous level of Spanish study in order to enter the next level with enhanced skills . Students develop their listening and speaking skills by viewing Spanish language videos, learning new vocabulary on themes they covered in SPA 201, and by producing audio and/or video recordings that use the material being reviewed . This is a distance learning class; students must have access to a computer with a broadband Internet connection and microphone and/or webcam .
Prerequisite: SPA 201 or permission of the instructor. This course may be appropriate for those intending to enroll in SPA 201 who have taken at least two years of high school Spanish.

SPA 275
Independent Study in Spanish
1-4   Credits
Independent study for students with a foundation in Spanish . Student and instructor determine a project and the number of credits to be earned. Regularly scheduled meetings between the student  and  instructor  are  required.
Prerequisites: Previous coursework in Spanish and permission of the instructor.

 

Theatre

THR 101

Introduction to the Theatre
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu
An introduction to the personalities  and  technological  innovations that make up the dynamics of the theatre experience . The origin of  modern-day  theatrical  practice  and  conventions  are  explored .


T
HR 102
Stagecraft I

3 Credits ■ Fall
An introduction  to  the  technology  of  theatre  production .  This course concentrates on the construction techniques for building stage scenery and costumes .  Students  devote  class  time  to building  sets  for  BCC  productions.
Skills prerequisites: MAT 018C or MAT 018. Prerequisite: THR 106.

THR 103
Stagecraft II

3 Credits ■ Spring
An introduction  to  the  technology  of  theatre  production .  This course concentrates on the equipment and techniques for implementing stage lighting and sound . Students devote class time to executing  lighting  and  sound  designs  for BCC  productions. 
Skills prerequisite: MAT 018C or MAT 018. Prerequisite: THR 106.

THR 104
Acting I
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu
A study of the basic principles of acting with  emphasis  on Stanislavski techniques . Focus will be  placed  on  the rehearsal and  performance  processes  including  discipline,   collaboration and evaluation .  The  course  will  include sections  on  the  business of acting and auditioning.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

THR 105
Acting II
3 Credits ■ Spring ■ HU/hu
Continued study of the principles of acting with emphasis  on scene study, script analysis,  and  ensemble  performance . Focus will be placed on acting in the style of American Realism covering contemporary  Western  playwrights.              
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.
Prerequisite: THR 104 or permission of the instructor.

THR 106
Fundamentals of Theatre Design
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
An introduction to theatrical design . This course focuses on creating the visual and aural elements necessary for a live stage  production as well as cultivating artistic expression . Aspects  include script analysis, interpretation, research,  and presentation .  The course will also  include  basic  drafting  and  rendering  techniques for the different facets of theatre design.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

THR 110
Acting for Television and Film
3 Credits ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
Students create dramatic pieces for television and film production  with  possible  transmission  on  public  television channels . Rehearsals and final production will be taped for analysis.
Prerequisite:  THR  105.

THR 111
History of Theatre and Drama I
3 Credits ■ HU/hu ■ CC-WC
A study of the history, plays, players, and playhouses from classical Greece to the early Renaissance.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

THR 112
History of Theatre and Drama II
3 Credits ■ HU/hu ■ CC-WC
A study of the history of European and American theatre from the Renaissance through the  Twentieth  Century . Emphasis  is  placed on the new theatre movements and the accompanying technical innovations . Far-Eastern contributions paralleling the Western experience  will  be  discussed.
Skills prerequisite: ENG 020 and ENG 060.

THR 119
Dance I
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HF
An   introductory   dance   course   exploring   movement,   technique, composition,  improvisation,  and  choreography . The  focus  of  this course is body awareness and control as well as use of the body as  a  means  of  self-expression and communication .  Previous dance training is not required.


THR 120
Dance II
3 Credits ■ HU
A continuation of THR 119, with more advanced study of dance technique, musicality, staging, and compositional skills . Prerequisite:  THR  119  or  permission  of  the  instructor.

THR 121
Choreography I
1 Credit
Studio work in choreography with a focus on the kinesthetic, dramatic, sculptural, musical  and  visual  approaches  to designing the human body moving in space. 
Prerequisite: THR 119 or THR 233 or permission of the instructor.

THR 122
Choreography II
1 Credit
A  continuation  of  THR  121  with  further  work  in  choreography with a focus on the kinesthetic, dramatic, sculptural, musical and visual approaches to designing the human body in space.
Prerequisite:  THR  121.

THR 198
Theatre Practicum
1 Credit
A theatre experience open to all students participating in college theatre productions . Credit is granted for responsible effort and achievement in a production crew or on stage. Students must attend  rehearsals  or  crew  sessions .

THR 199
Theatre Practicum
1 Credit
A theatre experience open to all students participating in college theatre productions. Credit is granted for responsible effort and achievement in a production crew or on stage. Students must attend rehearsals  or  crew  sessions.
Prerequisite: THR 198.


THR 205
Directing
3 Credits ■ As Needed ■ HU/hu ■ CC-CT
A study of the principles and techniques of play direction primarily designed for theatre majors or students with theatrical experience . This course is also helpful to majors in recreation, human services, and education . Class exercises include discussion and analysis of methods used to achieve focus, emphasis, pacing and visual design .

THR 206
Acting Styles
3 Credits ■ Fall ■ HU/hu
A  study  of  approaches  to  the  art  of  acting  in  theatrical  styles ranging from classical theater to theater of the absurd. Emphasis  will  be  placed  on  Shakespearean  acting  styles  as  explored through monologues and scene work . Course study will include text analysis, improvisation and ensemble performance.
Prerequisite: THR 104 or THR 105 or permission of the instructor.

THR 214
Modern Dramatic Literature
3 Credits ■ HU/hu ■ CC-OC
An  examination  of  significant,  contemporary  plays  and  musicals from  the  twentieth  and  twenty-first  centuries . Plays  will  be  studied  in  relation  to  their  historical  and  cultural  contexts,  theatrical styles,  production  and performance  techniques.  This  course  does NOT  fulfill  the  general  education  requirement  for  ENG  literature.
Skills  prerequisites:  ENG  020  and  ENG  060.    Recommendation:   Six   credits   of   composition.

THR 233
Movement for Actors
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
A movement course designed for acting students and theatre majors . This course focuses on two distinct areas: musical theatre/jazz dance technique and Rudolph Laban's 'Effort Actions', including an examination of their relevance to speech, character development  and  stage  movement.
Prerequisite: THR 104 or permission of the instructor.


THR 275
Independent Study in Theatre I
1-3 Credits
Independent study for students with a foundation in the field . Student and   instructor  determine   the  project   and   the number of credits to be earned . Projects may involve acting, directing, designing, and lighting . Regularly scheduled meetings between student  and  instructor  are  required.
Prerequisite: Permission of department chair or program advisor.

THR 276
Independent Study in Theatre II
1-3 Credits
Independent study for students with a foundation in the field . Student and   instructor  determine   the  project   and   the number of credits to be earned. Projects may involve acting, directing, designing, and lighting . Regularly scheduled meetings between student  and  instructor  are  required .
Prerequisite: Permission of department chair or program advisor.

THR 297
Special Topics in Theatre
3 Credits ■ HU/hu
Specific   course   content   at   the   discretion   of   the   department . Details  are  included  in  preregistration  materials.

THR 298
Theatre Practicum
1 Credit
A theatre experience open to all students participating in college theatre productions . Credit is granted for responsible effort and achievement in a production crew or on stage . Students must attend  rehearsals  or  crew  sessions Prerequisite: THR 199.

THR 299
Theatre Practicum
1 Credit
A theatre experience open to all students participating in college theatre productions . Credit is granted for responsible effort and achievement in a production crew or on stage . Students must attend  rehearsals  or  crew  sessions .
Prerequisite: THR 298